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Sarolea 123
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Stuart brown
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September 4, 2013 - 7:15 pm
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My new project for the winter is to get this bike up to a tidy runner.

It is a 1953 ( I am told) Sarolea, 'Oiseau Bleu' or Blue Bird.

It has a Belgian (?) number plate, and has (probably the original) Belgian made tyres!

Sarolea was a leading Belgian motorcycle manufacturer, racing bikes as far back as 1902, but during the war was involved with FN making arms. They came by the design as part of the war reparations - as did BSA.

This bike is based on the DKW design - as is the first Bantam but with the gears, kick star and brake mirror imaged.

Currently searching for any information on this model.

Will add photos as the rebuild begins.

 

Stu brown

Matlock

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Cornish Rooster
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September 4, 2013 - 7:26 pm
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With such a rare beast as they then its probably worth joining the VMCC as they have an extensive library  of material plus they will be able to provide a dating certificate for re-registering. They will possibly also have a Sarolea Marque Specialist, worth contacting them anyway.

Phil

BSA Bantam D1 "150" in use regularly often as general purpose transport, quite a few other bikes as well. Cornwall Area Rep. 

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Stuart brown
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September 6, 2013 - 5:48 pm
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Thanks for tip. I wll contact them this weekend.

Stu Brown

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September 6, 2013 - 5:56 pm
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not at weekends unfortunately, as below.

 The Club Headquarters are manned from 9.00 am to 5.30 pm Monday to Thursday, 9.00 to 4.00pm Friday.  Direct dial numbers only available during office hours

BSA Bantam D1 "150" in use regularly often as general purpose transport, quite a few other bikes as well. Cornwall Area Rep. 

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tomshep
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March 27, 2020 - 3:15 pm
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An update: I bought the Sarolea last Sunday. Although it has been made tidy and a great deal of money and time have been spent, it simply wouldn't go.

Two owners had tried and failed to get it running. Carb has been refurbished, the freshly rebored engine has new seals and bearings and the spark is fat, blue and regular. Something to get my teeth into.

The Sarolea isn't quite like a Bantam. Apart from the mirror image, the metric fittings and the almost complete absence of information, it has a base gasket that is larger than the Bantam's with an extra hole at the back about 3/16" in diameter. In the crankcase was a matching hole that went through to the lower chamber and in the barrel was a further mating hole, neatly plugged with an Allen headed grub screw. 

The Bantam base gasket wasn't covering the hole and turning the engine over revealed that there was no suction so I made a new gasket with my favourite hammer and covered the hole over.

 I checked all the settings, put the engine back together and it fired sporadically but it would not run.

   I had been a bit suspicious of the holes in the crankcase and the barrel. Had they been for a locating pin, then why did one go all the way through?  And what was behind the grub screw? A passage into the inlet manifold, that's what. The tapped hole looked to be in very good condition and the grub screw was new. Too new. Not the sort of thing that Sarolea would have fitted in 1951. It wasn't in the parts list, either.

    The penny dropped. The passage was to speed up the suction on the carb at low revs. Being about two inches long, it wouldn't have any great effect at high revs  because the air would move too slowly as the piston descended and  would be effective at the low throttle openings corresponding to slow engine speeds. Well, that was my theory, anyway so the barrel came off, which on the Sarolea entails removing the tank which on the Sarolea entails removing the seat...

The allen key pulled a nice new grub screw out of the barrel and my mate Stanley adjusted the gasket before I put the whole lot together.

Set a crack of throttle and kick. Third go it spluttered and ran for about three seconds. Pulled the plug out to find it covered in gunge from the crankcase. A lifetime's supply of Hylomar, by the look of it. Clean, kick, splutter repeat until it not only started to run without dying after a few seconds but responded to the twistgrip.

It needs a fishtail on the exhaust because it is rather noisy but as I am isolating myself in the garage block, there was nothing for it but to see if the brute had enough power to pull me around the car park. It does. Everything needs tightening, t-cutting fettling and fiddling with but the Sarolea Oiseau Bleu is a runner so here's to the Belgian Bantam.

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Blue Heeler
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March 27, 2020 - 3:42 pm
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Occasionally enjoy the scenario when some poor booga`s done all the hard graft and there`s just the final tweaks left to do...am I  mercenary? Hope you soon get to enjoy your Sarolea Blue on the open road. Any pics forthcoming? Is this similar...** Please log in to view **    Looks like a nice little bike

Cheers,

Bleu Heeler.

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Number6
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March 27, 2020 - 4:15 pm
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Congrats laugh

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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tomshep
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March 27, 2020 - 4:25 pm
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This one

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cocorico
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March 27, 2020 - 4:34 pm
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Well done indeed. Don't forget your pictures have to be less than 1Mb or the forum won't post them.

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tomshep
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March 27, 2020 - 6:36 pm
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I had no idea of the size of the image and was not aware of the restriction. Don't worry; I won't bother you again.

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Stoo63
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March 27, 2020 - 7:27 pm
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Hi Tom. No bother. Have a look ** Please log in to view ** for info on posting pics. sure we'd all like a look at it.

Stewart

'52 D1 direct lighting plunger; '58 Square Four (project); '55 D3 Battery; '59 D1 direct lighting plunger;  '59 Tiger Cub; '60 5TA;  '76 FS1-E '97 Honda Sky SGX50.

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tomshep
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April 4, 2020 - 11:20 pm
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The engine runs well enough once it starts so I decided to build a flywheel remagnetiser out of an M27 nut, six soft iron rods and 680 volts charging 18,800 microfarads of capacitance dumped through about an Ohm with an inductance of around 1.3 millihenries.  About 150,000 Ampere turns. Ought to do it. There is no substitute for sheer brute force. In order to quieten the exhaust which has no tailcone yet, the last baffle had been closed up.  I have opened it up again expecting a suitable aluminium tube to arrive for making a fishtail out of.

The bike now changes gear as the clever means of destroying the clutch  gearbox and casings devised by a previous owner with creat care was removed and the whole lot reassembled correctly. The bodge on the rear brake had to go as well  and I wound a new kickstart return spring which only took three attempts to be functional. The Sarolea has an off button in the magneto body which had long disappeared and will be replaced with one turned up from Tufnol next week. The articulated seat which currently is the site of much ingenious bodgery will  be reinstated as it was once the world goes back to normal and I can dig out a welder. Until then, I shall make up the bracketry trom 3mm mild steel strip.

That should see it fairly functional but I have to sort the wiring out and I am looking forward to finding out what has been done there!

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Stoo63
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April 5, 2020 - 12:00 am
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Sounds like you've got plenty to keep you busy over the duration, Tom. I'm particularly interested, as I'm sure others will be, to hear of your progress with your remagnetiser. It's a topic that's cropped up a couple of times before and the apparatus usually looks like something from Dr. Frankenstein's laboratory 😂Good luck with it. 

Stewart

'52 D1 direct lighting plunger; '58 Square Four (project); '55 D3 Battery; '59 D1 direct lighting plunger;  '59 Tiger Cub; '60 5TA;  '76 FS1-E '97 Honda Sky SGX50.

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cocorico
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April 5, 2020 - 7:39 am
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Wow, what a mental image your remagnetizer description gives. As Stoo says, be interested in your results.

Sparky.jpg

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tomshep
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April 5, 2020 - 9:18 am
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People think it is sorcery and if somebody who does this for a living talks about creating a flux field using a big capacitor,  you get the usual giggling and banal inanities. The following is not for them:

This device contains quite enough energy to get you seriously killed first go. If you don't know exactly what I am talking about don't even think about it. 

The idea is like your cdi ignition. The capacitors are charged to a very high voltage and then the energy is simply switched into a suitable coil which is wound around a yoke of soft iron that makes very good mechanical contact with all the pole pieces simultaneously. If you plan to make your own, be aware that the capacitors will need to be very low ESR and will cost about £60. Each. You will need eight of them .4,700 microfarads at 400Volts. Each will be about the size of a jam jar.

 The mains is rectified giving 340 volts   and half of the capacitors are charged(Measure with multimeter,) before switching the rectified voltage to the second bank to charge (Measure with multimeter,) using a DPDT centre off switch Once both banks are charged, set the switch to off. The capacitors are discharged through a coil that is wound South North South North South North around a star shaped yoke. Drill each face of the nut to 12mm and insert a suitable length of iron rod to get to the pole piece of your flywheel to create this. Shape the end to be a good fit to the pole piece- this is important. Use a low voltage and current supply and a compass to put a small magnetic field into the yoke so that the polarities of the coils can be verified. Use about 40 turns of 1.25mm enamelled copper wire on each rod, winding the first clockwise, the second anticlockwise third clockwise, fourth anticlockwise fifth clockwise and sixth anticlockwise. There isn't much room, work neatly. Mark a North pole  AND THE POSITIVE LEAD once it has been identified so it can be positioned on a South pole of the flywheel which will also be identified with a compass. Polarity is all important from here on in if you don't want an inert flywheel. 

 

  The discharge switch is a starter solenoid from a Land Rover and is wired to the coil with cable from a jump lead, the thicker the better.The solenoid is driven from a 12 volt battery and a microswitch. The energy transfer will take about a millisecond.

Measure the capacitor voltages to ensure that they have discharged and the job is done.

Before and after test. Put the flywheel into a few boxes  of m6x20 screws which Screwfix do cheaply and weigh the amount that are picked up.

Rule of thumb, ten per cent more bolts is about 50 % more spark energy.

Calculations:

Coil resistance 10 metres of 1.25 diameter copper comes out at around 0.15 Ohms, At 1 KHZ, wound on a soft iron core it is around 0,67Ohms according to the brand new £6000 Wayne Kerr (Yes, really) inductance analyser in my lab. The capacitor ESR is 33 milliohms but there are four in parallel giving eight and four more in the other bank making around 16. Add that to 0,670 giving 0.686 Ohms.  Connecting wires to the coil are going to add 0.1 to that and allow the same for losses in the connections and solenoid. 0.9 Ohms. Call it one Ohm worst case.

Dump 680 volts across an Ohm and you get 680 Amperes. Apply that to 240 turns  gives a minimum flux of 163200 Ampere turns. This will not supercharge your magnets. They only have a certain capacity but it will make them as good as new, which is what you want because anything more could cause insulation breakdown in the HT, boiled batteries and blown bulbs due to overvoltage.

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Stoo63
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April 5, 2020 - 9:48 am
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Fascinating. Beyond my ken. There has been a bit of discussion on this on the forum ** Please log in to view ** which may prove interesting....

And we'd definitely love to see pictures of this device.

Stewart

'52 D1 direct lighting plunger; '58 Square Four (project); '55 D3 Battery; '59 D1 direct lighting plunger;  '59 Tiger Cub; '60 5TA;  '76 FS1-E '97 Honda Sky SGX50.

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April 5, 2020 - 12:27 pm
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Tom, are the majority of mechanically intact but tired gen rotors salvageable using your technique?

I like the magnetic evaluation using M6x20 screws, perhaps we can use that as a new standard on here for checking our old flywheels?........what, yours is only attracting 155 screws, huh, mine`s doing 183...

Look forward to seeing some pics of your lovely little bike and the amazing lab gear you have, when you`ve got time.

Thanks,

Blue

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mikef
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April 5, 2020 - 1:50 pm
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Hi Tom.
      Fantastic rig of yours to remagnetise a rotor. I even found myself looking into the cost of the capacitors. Unfortunately unless you have the components already or have a lot of rotors to remagnetise then the cost is prohibitive, also soft iron rod seems difficult to get hold of.
So I think I won't be building such a rig in the near future but it could be done. It says a lot for the insulation breakdown characteristics of a Land Rover starter solenoid.
Good luck with the project.
     Mike.

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tomshep
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April 5, 2020 - 3:16 pm
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I built a serious magnetiser for a friend who does magnetos and he gifted me his spare caps. I think that my technique will work on any flywheel. The rods are readily available but 12mm is the only diameter available. It is not as big as I would like so I compensate with  huge amounts of power. If I can shrink the picture, I will be able to show the embryonic yoke.

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tomshep
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April 5, 2020 - 6:30 pm
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Life is too short to find out how to resize pictures so I won't  having spent half an hour trying. Please don't offer to show me how, I have far better things to do with my time. This afternoon I made new tank mounting brackets and a new front hoop for the seat  which extends downwards to pick up the horizontal seat springs The seat frame needs to be mounted to this but first I need to make all the fiddly bits that do with it, brass bushes to pivot on and the spacer to hold the bottom of the hoop  legs. Lots of drilling bits of aluminium rod  to take  studs and I haven't found my bag of M8 dome nuts that have evaded me all day.

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