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Honda CD175 twin, four stroke of 1972 vintage.
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Mags 1
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May 13, 2019 - 10:51 am
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Thanks Jolon1 for your moral support, it's something we all need on these long haul jobs, much appreciated.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:10 pm
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I started to tackle my least favourite job of all on the Honda the other day, I know the car industry now sells tools and materials for repairing different plastics as used on bumpers and interior trim for example, but I doubt I'd get my moneys worth on so small a job as this, the side panels are plastic too, by the way.

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There are many, many, different types of plastic and what type or sort Honda used here is a mystery to me. The triple whammy here is not really enjoying using filler or paint either, to be honest, but parts will just lay there until I get set and do something with them. The large split here looks like accident damage.

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Both of the small holes underneath cowl that carry the screws for rim and reflector anchorage are broken or cracked, not a healthy looking start really.

I'd bought ten small tubes of superglue from my local poundshop, used only a small fraction of one to get some fluid into cracks around the screw holes, after removing the steel reinforcing pieces firstly of course. This glue is inaerobic we're told, which means it cures best when air or oxygen maybe is excluded, just holding the two joining surfaces together tightly generally takes care of that, another snippet is that this glue was originally designed to glue together human skin, I hear it's used in hospitals for such things as male hernia surgery etc...

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:20 pm
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Someone else had already had a go I thought, but whether by soldering iron or glassfibre etc. I'm not sure.

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Once the stengtheners are out, job looks even worse, getting them back in accurately will be a laugh, no doubt.

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The aforementioned items, I mounted them upon an old screwdriver and gave them a whirl on the wire wheel, don't want rust interfering with new paint etc.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:30 pm
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Before starting with the filler, I thought I'd use the thinners to wipe away the grey primer a P.O. had put on, couldn't understand why anyone would prime plastic before dealing with the splits and cracks firstly. As you can see by the wet paper towelling, nothing at all came away, I've learned not to handle primed items with bare flesh, simply because acids and oils from skin will ruin any paint job. Trying to remove fingerprints with thinner always takes paint off, no matter how gently you apply it.

The grey covering was actually filler, not primer of course, but I had to be sure.

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One reinforcing tube was in really well and I damaged the plastic in my efforts to remove it, but no worries, filler will always do its job.

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Wiped cowling over twice with thinner to get rid of any dirt or oil etc, wearing throwaway gloves does help too. I generally mix up a tad more filler than I actually think I need each time, instead of constantly prodding the work piece, you can poke at the left overs and tell by them when rest is hard enough to work on. Applying the stuff correctly doesn't take long, but it's the sanding down which gets to me, it seems to take so long before you get anywhere near, then suddenly you're too deep into what you were trying to keep...

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:42 pm
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I like to use these foam filled emery squares, my local paint shop was doing a five for a quid or similar offer at the time, they come in various grades and you can use them dry like here or else with warm water and a dash of wash up liquid in it, which helps to unclog the paper and lubrcates it as well.

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I'd soon removed the bulk of my own filler and some of P.O's too, in places. I missed my cork sanding block, but then again, trhere's hardly a flat square inch on the whole moulding.

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Uh oh, too far gone here, I'll have to treat each bad area as a job on its own almost, by the looks of things. Yes, I'd used the superglue here too, to good effect hopefully. Filler and paint will also help to keep the thing together.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:49 pm
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The small dillema of how much filler to use around the rim retainers screw holes, reared its head again, looks to me like too much one side and not enough the other...

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A lapse in concentration soon brings up the true colour of the underlying plastic. The smaller holes are for the indicator stalk retaining lug/s.

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This is the area where cowl meets up with metal backing plate, I put a dab of filler on here as area looked ragged and uneven, it won't take long to get shot of it if I'm wrong, but I can only tell that now with that other part fixed to bike etc. things sometimes have a way of deceiving you.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 14, 2019 - 11:54 pm
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On a more positive note, I managed to get two coats of clear lacquer onto a few parts that were waiting.

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Both brake plates.

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Both front fork lower legs of course, also used black coloured lacquer on steel items like the side stand here.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 15, 2019 - 12:01 am
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Did lots of other steel parts in black too, like the toolbox, battery box, footrest rail, as well as swing arm here, which didn't do so well as the other stuff, can was nearly empty and nozzle was spitting a bit, a bad omen when it's your last tin...

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I found best way with this stuff was to move can more slowly than normal and only stop just sdhort of a run, sounds like madness I know, but it did seem to work quite well in practise.

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Came from Lidl I believe, usual disclaimers...haven't seen it in there lately though.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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BonesCDI
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May 15, 2019 - 5:47 am
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Keep the posts coming Mags, It's coming along well.

In relation to the plastic, I was recently put onto a Permatex product that comes in a twin tube dispenser much like the araldite tubes you get.

I have a lot of problems with the fairing on my Cagiva cracking and this is the only stuff that works effectively. It's totally different in composition to araldites and I've been really impressed with it.

your bike's coming along nicely, thanks for going to the trouble of posting all your pictures.

Bones

Running and project bikes from 1912 -2005..........She hasn't said stop yet.........

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cocorico
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May 15, 2019 - 7:44 am
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BonesCDI said
...In relation to the plastic, I was recently put onto a Permatex product that comes in a twin tube dispenser much like the araldite tubes you get...It's totally different in composition to araldites and I've been really impressed with it.

Mags 1 said
...I'd bought ten small tubes of superglue from my local poundshop, used only a small fraction of one to get some fluid into cracks around the screw holes,... another snippet is that this glue was originally designed to glue together human skin, I hear it's used in hospitals for such things as male hernia surgery etc...  

I've used something called Q-Bond (** Please log in to view **) with some success as a filler for plastic. Basically, is superglue and a filler. It does set VERY hard though, so it's best to proceed slowly so that you don't need to remove a lot of excess!

Now don't try this at home, kids,
I've also used superglue on a couple of bad cuts I inflicted on myself (trying to chop left-handed - long story...) - it is very good, even on cuts I thought might need stitching.

The Bantam Club Forum - all the answers are in there.

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Mags 1
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May 15, 2019 - 10:57 am
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Thanks for the encouraging comments Bones and Cocorico, I got a recommendation to try Amazon for the glue, but £98 20??? Can't be can it?

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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swalsh58
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May 15, 2019 - 11:20 am
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Mags 1 said
Thanks for the encouraging comments Bones and Cocorico, I got a recommendation to try Amazon for the glue, but £98 20??? Can't be can it?  

Q Bond is about £8 each on ebay

Current bikes......1958 D5, a 77 Suzuki GT250 and a 77 Honda CB125S. I have a 74 Kawasaki S3 400 and a B175 waiting for restoration. A 1980 Honda CB400N waiting for MOT.  Everyday ride is a 2011 Harley Davidson Sportster. 

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johnsullivan
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May 15, 2019 - 2:33 pm
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Amazon have weird rules about continuity of listing so sellers ram a silly price on to avoid saying no stock.If you have a scrap bit of acrylic its shavings or dust can be mixed with superglue for a budget filler.

67 D10. and a D7    2007 Honda Hornet FA. 93 Yamaha TTR 250 Raid, Sinnis SC 125. 78 Honda 90  75 Montesa Cota 247 an electric scooter of Famous make.

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mike p5xbx
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May 15, 2019 - 5:50 pm
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Never used Q bond but super glue and Baking soda workes quite well on some plastic, and its Cheap cheep
recently repaired a broken eye fixing hole on a Sabrina rear lamp
lots videos on Utube

D? - D10- D14 Bantams 350 AJS -500 Triumph http://bsanotru.....lfire.com/

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Mags 1
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May 15, 2019 - 10:55 pm
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Thanks everyone for some interesting comments, I've just bought a twin tube Araldite type twin tube Permatex plastic repair kit type bargain at £6.99, a bit more like it, cheers all.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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BonesCDI
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May 16, 2019 - 5:59 am
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mike p5xbx said
Never used Q bond but super glue and Baking soda workes quite well on some plastic, and its Cheap cheep
recently repaired a broken eye fixing hole on a Sabrina rear lamp
lots videos on Utube  

I have used this too Mike and is basically a "paupers" version of Q bond. That said I thought it worked well.

Q Bond is great stuff but with anything that seems to have a bit of flex it seemed to crack again on the things I used it on.

That Permatex stuff seems to have some inherent flex in it and has worked really well so far. I also think it has a better bond to the plastic in fairings than super glue/ araldite type adhesives.

Be interesting to see how Mag's goes with it.

Running and project bikes from 1912 -2005..........She hasn't said stop yet.........

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Mags 1
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May 16, 2019 - 10:42 pm
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Going back to the rear mudguard again, the blasting cabinet will soon be in use again, no good just hoping that all the flaky rust will fall out, the stuff is trapped behind overlaying outer layer, which needs to be removed.

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This is so deep that I could actually use filler, after a good blasting first though.

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Just so much to do, but forty six years is a long time for bike to be still in one piece.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 16, 2019 - 11:05 pm
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I do like a full day ahead of me when I prepare for blasting; I hate having to work under constraints of time, having to move bikes just to get machine out, servicing compressor (draining water adding oil etc.), servicing vacuum cleaner, sieving blast medium, renewing screen inner cover material etc etc all take time, a warm day helps, otherwise one's hot breath on the cabinet glass steams it up so bad you can't see what you're doing.

Blasted items generally require some paint on same day, if they're not going to rust overnight, but often there are parts that need welding up after blasting, seemingly making painting a waste of time if you want a good earth contact, but not signs of burnt back paint all over!

Once you get into these jobs you begin to appreciate how it is maybe, for folk who do such work to live.

So it's nice to have other smaller jobs on the agenda too, allowing you to put the blasting work off for yet another day...wanted to get the old rubbers back into their places on the battery holding frame, the ultrasonic cleaner hasn't got all the flaky rust off quiute, a squirt of Wd40 did help that and made them easier to get back into the holes, halfway through the job I began to wonder if new ones would have just popped straight in, but my conscience then wanted to know 'how much each'?!

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One day I hope to find a front hinged part to go with this, original was probably rusted, acid eaten and thrown away. Even with a badly worn part like that, it would have been a simple enough job to copy it in car body type sheet metal, but generally the folk who throw such things out hardly ever let such thoughts pass through their heads, it would seem.

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Just realised that I could have sprayed some more black gloss over those rubbers, if I hadn't put the WD40 on them...I like the way that Honda seem to take a different approach to old problems, whether or not these six rubbers actually increased the batteries lives or not makes no odds, showing that you've at least taken time and spent money in trying to "think out of the box" sort of approach attracted many new customers, I'm sure.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 18, 2019 - 12:42 am
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The silver wheel paint and lacquer finish isn't as good as the original polished ally look, but unless I can find a good but cheap replacement front hub, this look will have to suffice, I'm happy enough with it.

I like to keep on trying to do something to bike most days, it gives the feeling that progress is still being made.

Small job today (yesterday now) was tro make some felt seals for splined brake operating shaft hole here.

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Working on foreign bikes gets you measuring and thinking in mm's I find, 20mm on outer circle and 15 on the inner.

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I enjoy using old tools and using old work methods, the cheap Rolson Chinese punches are newest ones I own, but bought in the 80's I think, they are imperial sizes.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Mags 1
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May 18, 2019 - 12:48 am
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This is the coarsish felt I used to make some Bantam points felts with, I felt sure it would suffice for this job too.

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I checked to make sure hollow punch was going to make the seal big enough, a bit too big is fine with felt as it's compressible to a degree.

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A concrete floor, a bit of flat softwood and a bigish hammer all made the job go swiftly.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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