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Jim Reynolds Bantam Banter article, driving test
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larryc
burnley lancashire
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March 18, 2021 - 10:56 am
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The Banter mag was delivered this morning so a cup of coffee and a good read.

I enjoyed Jim's article which included the motorcycle driving test which made me smile and remember my own test. The test centre was in the small town of Padiham near Burnley, in 1970 there were no roundabouts or traffic lights in Padiham! car tests went further afield to include these features but motorcycles were limited to the examiner walking around to various points to watch you ride around.

As Jim states the emergency stop involved the examiner stepping to the kerb holding his board up to signal you to stop! he was stood behind a telephone box so I could see him easily and was ready on my brakes. All in all the test was very basic, left and right turns, pulling away and riding slowly (at walking pace) remember the theory bit, he had a pack of flip cards with road signs, which you had to explain what they were. I passed first time on a tiger cub.

When you passed your test you could ride any size bike so in theory you could pass your test on a D1 Bantam a month after your 16th birthday and ride a 750cc motorcycle at 16yrs 1month and a day!

Larry

D1 plunger, T20 cub, working on a 1955 T20 cub plunger

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cocorico
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March 18, 2021 - 11:10 am
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larryc said
... in theory you could pass your test on a D1 Bantam a month after your 16th birthday and ride a 750cc motorcycle at 16yrs 1month and a day!

Larry  

But a 750 of that time was probably a poorer handling (and not much quicker) bike than a modern 125. rofl fishing    out-a-here

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Bryan Price
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March 18, 2021 - 11:18 am
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My 'bike test' was conducted in July 1975 whilst I was on my RCT Troop Commanders Course at the Army School of Transport - then in Longmoor, Hants. Because of Crown Exemption, we were taught to ride on the standard Service machine - the BSA B40. We were expected to be proficient cross-country riders, as bikes were used for recce purposes as well as communications. Our 'test' comprised a Trials course, which we had to complete with a very limited number of 'dabs' permissible. Then a straight blast against the clock: over a cross-country route from one end of the Longmoor Training Area, to the other. Some of the spills were quite spectacular, and the whole scheme just wouldn't be allowed these days by the Elf'n'Safety Brigade.

Fondest memories are of riding a B40 'flat out' between Whitehill and Bordon, chin on the tank and just struggling to reach 60 mph. Happy daze...

tip-my-hat

D1 Plunger, D3 Swing Arm, D14/4 . Also e-mail me: membership@bsabantamclub.org.uk

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cocorico
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March 18, 2021 - 2:25 pm
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Bryan Price said
...riding a B40 'flat out' between Whitehill and Bordon, chin on the tank and just struggling to reach 60 mph. Happy daze...
 

See what I mean? wink

My test was in '67 at the Perry Barr Test Centre. Tester asked a few questions, I read a number plate at an appropriate distance, rode round the block and stopped when he waved his clip board. I would hate to have to take one today.

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Number6
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March 18, 2021 - 11:15 pm
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CBT, theory test, practical tests modules 1 & 2, and that's the quick version! (If you're 24 or over) freaked-out_gif

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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Bryan Price
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March 19, 2021 - 12:49 am
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Yep - I can't help thinking that the whole 'licence acquisition' process has been designed to be deliberately obstructive and expensive - in order to reduce the number of people getting into motorcycling. Probably under the auspices of making motorcycling safer. But pocket-rocket race-replicas capable of 150 mph don't do anything for the public image of bikers. Bah Humbug.

D1 Plunger, D3 Swing Arm, D14/4 . Also e-mail me: membership@bsabantamclub.org.uk

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Lone Wolf
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March 19, 2021 - 2:53 am
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cocorico said

My test was in '67 at the Perry Barr Test Centre. 

Wotcha.

Mine was about ten years later - and a toss up between Perry Barr and Bilston.

Bilston won and I passed . . . . . riding a Bantam of course.

^..^

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cocorico
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March 19, 2021 - 7:51 am
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Lone Wolf said
...Bilston won and I passed ...

Ah, Bilston was 3 times further than Perry Barr, and I couldn't speak the lingo, either...

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Number6
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March 19, 2021 - 11:55 pm
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Bryan Price said
Yep - I can't help thinking that the whole 'licence acquisition' process has been designed to be deliberately obstructive and expensive - in order to reduce the number of people getting into motorcycling. Probably under the auspices of making motorcycling safer. But pocket-rocket race-replicas capable of 150 mph don't do anything for the public image of bikers. Bah Humbug.  

http://livinginthepast-audioweb.co.uk/imagex/misc/like-button2.jpg

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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mike p5xbx
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March 20, 2021 - 12:39 am
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Bryan Price said
Yep - I can't help thinking that the whole 'licence acquisition' process has been designed to be deliberately obstructive and expensive
  

One extreme to the other really
I took my test in mid 1960s (Yes on a D1 Bantam) It was farcical really as the examiner could only see you for 10% of the time
I cant really see how it would have been possible to fail the test apart from getting lost riding around the block of running over the examiner when he jumped out from behind a Van to test emergency stop
he did however ask some of the most obscure highway code question in the book read-manual

D? - D10- D14 Bantams 350 AJS -500 Triumph http://bsanotru.....lfire.com/

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Sponge
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March 21, 2021 - 9:32 am
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I think that I managed to fail my motorcycle test the first time at Sale in Cheshire. My friend offered to lend me his Suzuki GT250 Ram Air missile because it was a lot easier to start than my old D10 Bantam. I should have declined but the offer was too good to refuse...a nice new Suzuki. I thought that I had mastered the left foot change and the awesome brakes. All was going well until the emergency stop when the examiner actually jumped out from behind a phone box waving his clipboard. It was a true surprise as he had doubled down an alley and emerged at a totally unexpected place. In the excitement of the moment I managed to stamp on the gearlever and locked up the front wheel which nearly put me out of the front door. To cap it all I stalled the bike!, could not find neutral and it would not re-start. Once I had it running...in a cloud of two stroke smoke ..one look  at the examiner said it all....he was shaking his head, making notes and I could see it in his face....at that point I was reminded of Giacomi Agostini's strategy for when things were not going entirely his own way ....so I just screamed off and went home leaving the examiner standing on the pavement. 

2 months later I presented myself at the same testing station, on my B25 with a different examiner. The B25 had a really good TLS front brake and excellent tyres it behaved faultlessly. I passed with no problems.  I think that was the last time I ever rode a Suzuki. 

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Unitminor
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March 21, 2021 - 10:02 am
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I passed mine at Mile cross Norwich in the mid sixties but how I passed is a miracle . We spent the week end before setting up the timing on my C11 G as it kept going out . The day of the test when he said stop the bike now restart it the blinking thing would not start thinking i was going to have to bump start it but it did eventually splutter in to life . Little later he said go down the road and turn right but with out thinking i put my left hand out . As Luck would have it i pulled in to the left and when clear carried on and by doing that it saved from failing oh happy days .

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larryc
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March 21, 2021 - 10:40 am
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Sponge said
I think that I managed to fail my motorcycle test the first time at Sale in Cheshire. My friend offered to lend me his Suzuki GT250 Ram Air missile because it was a lot easier to start than my old D10 Bantam. I should have declined but the offer was too good to refuse...a nice new Suzuki. I thought that I had mastered the left foot change and the awesome brakes. All was going well until the emergency stop when the examiner actually jumped out from behind a phone box waving his clipboard. It was a true surprise as he had doubled down an alley and emerged at a totally unexpected place. In the excitement of the moment I managed to stamp on the gearlever and locked up the front wheel which nearly put me out of the front door. To cap it all I stalled the bike!, could not find neutral and it would not re-start. Once I had it running...in a cloud of two stroke smoke ..one look  at the examiner said it all....he was shaking his head, making notes and I could see it in his face....at that point I was reminded of Giacomi Agostini's strategy for when things were not going entirely his own way ....so I just screamed off and went home leaving the examiner standing on the pavement. 

2 months later I presented myself at the same testing station, on my B25 with a different examiner. The B25 had a really good TLS front brake and excellent tyres it behaved faultlessly. I passed with no problems.  I think that was the last time I ever rode a Suzuki.   

Great story, made me laugh...... out-a-here

D1 plunger, T20 cub, working on a 1955 T20 cub plunger

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mcafee
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March 22, 2021 - 7:01 am
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.Those were the days.I had been riding around for a couple of years on L plates and decided to book my test in Doncaster but a week before my Talisman Twin gave up the ghost so I was stuck .Most of my friends had passed their tests and were riding large capacity bikes but one had a Honda 50 and offered it to me explainiing that because it didnt have pedals it was classed as a motorcycle.This was1964 and like everyone else I rode round the block several times waving my arms about and looking behind me as you were supposed to do. I kept my eyes open for the examiner waiting for the emergency stop,I saw him in the distance and just as I got near him a lady stepped from behind a car with a pushchair.If I had been on my Taliaman Twin I would have hit the lady and her offspring but the Honda brakes were excellent.I stopped looked behind and waved her across the road all this in full view of the examiner and 15 minutes later drove home waving my bit of paper. The following day I took my 600 Dominator for a ride and never looked back.Tthank god I passed my test then I dread to think how I would get on now.

Stay safe everyone and lets hope this summer will be better than the last

David

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Lone Wolf
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March 22, 2021 - 11:47 am
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mike p5xbx said

I cant really see how it would have been possible to fail the test apart from getting lost riding around the block 

Wotcha.

A friend of mine took his test, also at Bilston, on a Cossack Voskhod.  The test route was a simple "square"  Turn right - cross the main road - turn right, then next right, then back across the main road to end up back where you started from. . . . simple enough . . . . apart from my friend got lost.  He did eventually spot the examiner who was trying to flag him down.  "I suppose I've failed then" - - - the examiner replied "No, it's a driving test, not a navigational skills test"  The good news was, he passed.

^..^

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