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Alan's B175 restoration
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Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
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August 20, 2020 - 8:56 pm
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So...to measure the endfloat. I have drilled a hole in my workbench so the driveside end of the crank can go through it and the crankcase will then sit flush with the bench.  It is then possible to use a dial gauge (dead cheap on Ebay) to measure the endfloat by pressing the crankshaft upwards from under the bench. This is a simple way to accurately measure the endfloat.

SDC13870-1.JPG

Anyhow...with the original bearings in I had 16 thou endfloat. Removed the alternator side bearing and fitted the replacement....I now had 8.5 thou endfloat...about half the original. So clearly the new bearing was not sitting fully in the bearing recess. If I was to loose the same amount of endfloat on the opposite bearing I would have no endfloat at all (which is an issue others have had).

I then removed the new bearing and set about scraping/filing the step away. The removal of this section of the bore will not harm the integrity of the bearing fit as only the bottom 1/16" is being altered.

With the new bearing refitted the endfloat was now 19.5 thou I had regained the original clearance plus a bit more which meant that that even the original Hoffman bearings are not fully seated in the recess.

Here's a before and after, you can clearly see the gap where the bearing was not fully seated 

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Before scraping away ridge.

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After scraping away ridge.

So tomorrow I will fit the new bearings to the other side and then set about 'shimming' it up. 

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Stoo63
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August 20, 2020 - 9:11 pm
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Really smart work as ever, Alan. Can't wait for you to by a basket case D1 and give that the Moore treatment 🙂

 '55 D3 Battery; '58 Square Four (project); '59 D1 direct lighting plunger; '59 Tiger Cub; '60 5TA;  '76 FS1-E; '97 Honda Sky SGX50.

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Stoo63
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August 20, 2020 - 9:11 pm
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Really smart work as ever, Alan. Can't wait for you to by a basket case D1 and give that the Moore treatment 🙂

 '55 D3 Battery; '58 Square Four (project); '59 D1 direct lighting plunger; '59 Tiger Cub; '60 5TA;  '76 FS1-E; '97 Honda Sky SGX50.

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Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
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August 21, 2020 - 7:21 pm
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Thanks for the kind comment Stoo.

Re me doing a D1....My Grandpa had a 1951 rigid frame D1 which I used to pillion when i was in my early teens, strapped to him with a leather belt. He was 20 odd stone and so we didn't go any where very quickly 🙂 When he passed away in the mid seventies it got turned into a field bike for me and my brother. Then in the nineties my Dad wanted to get rid of all the dismantled and rusty bits of bikes in his shed. I had a young family and no money and the D1 needed a full rebuild....there was only really the frame and petrol tank left and the frame was broken in two places.

Long story short a mate of mine, who lives in AUS, had a container load of stuff going from UK to AUS and my Dad offered him all the bantam bits we had. I've still got the V5 and its on the DVLA computer (we had the sense back in the eighties to get all of our old log books put on the new DVLA system) but I don't have the bike/frame...If only. I'll have to see if my mates still got it tucked away somewhere...I don't think he ever did anything with it. Bit expensive to get the frame shipped back though.

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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August 22, 2020 - 12:02 am
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Back to the B175...

I've now removed the 'ridge /step' from the bottom of the main bearing bore on the second crankcase and have gained another 3.5 thou endfloat (the same increase as on the first one). So I now have 23 thou endfloat compared with 16 thou when the original Hoffman bearings were fitted. Both old and new bearings are the same width so this tends to confirm that the 'lip' was also preventing the original bearings from fully seating in the crankcase bore, albeit by only 3.5 thou each side. 

So...BSA say 4 to 6 thou endfloat. I'm going for the lower figure so 23 minus 4 = 19 thous of shims required. I'm going with 10 thou driveside and a 9 thou (5+4) on the opposite side.

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 1, 2020 - 6:17 pm
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Centre Stand

So...I bought a centre stand from Ebay but it was too short for a B175. The stand was for a D7 and was 8 inches from centre of pivot to bottom of foot, the B175 one is 8 3/4". 

I tried adding a bit of box section to the foot to gain the extra length but it looked rubbish.

I cut through the legs and inserted a section of solid rod to extend them required amount.

SDC13899.JPG

The stands 'feet' were well worn so i  inserted a piece of rod and welded it in to give a nice solid base.

SDC13897.JPG

A piece of tube was cut to fill the gap and then the rod was plug welded to the upper and lower part of the stand and the piece of tube was welded to the upper and lower sections of the original leg.

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Continued next post.....

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1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 1, 2020 - 6:22 pm
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After that the welds were cleaned up

SDC13903-1.JPG

And with it fitted the rear wheel is a respectable distance off the deck and the stand is at at the correct angle. 

SDC13907.JPG

Cheers

Alan

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1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 6, 2020 - 7:01 pm
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Electrics part 1

So...I've decided to go with 12 volt negative earth and a simplified wiring harness, but retaining the original twin switches. A Rectifier/Regulator is being used. Its one of the 160 watt 4 wire Wassell ones that Rex and others sell...about £35 if you shop around on Ebay. The battery is an AGM  12 volt 6 amp hour YTX7LBS...about £25 from Tanya batteries. Its designed for bikes with electric starts so should be pretty robust when used in a Bantam.

First job was to make a battery box. A base was made from 1.5mm steel sheet with the edges folded up and welded together and this was bolted to the original battery support with countersunk set screws and some rubber packing underneath where the original battery would have sat. A retaining bracket was then made to secure the battery in place. The battery needs to be offset towards the left side of the bike so it clears the air intake tube from the carb to the airfilter.

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1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 6, 2020 - 7:26 pm
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Electrics part 2

I wanted to keep the original twin switches and i found a post by LoneWolf which showed how to wire them up so that you would get power to the coil and the lighting switch with the ignition switch in either the I or E position. Going to 12 volts means you loose the emergency start facility but otherwise I think 12 volts is the way to go. 

Here is the wiring diagram I drew up which also shows the altered wiring for the two switches. I think its a good idea to fit fuses. The horn/brakelight are fed from a separate fuse to the ignition/light feed. The reason is that the horn (more about using a 6 volt horn on 12 volts later) takes about 3 amps and putting it on a separate fuse means the ignition fuse can be smaller giving better protection. I've also included a fuse in the feed from the regulator to the battery the reason being that, if there was a short to earth elsewhere in the system this fuse will protect the regulator.

Bantam-12-volt-wiring-diagram-1.JPG

As can be seen there is an earth wire to the headlamp shell and to the rear lamp so these lamps are not relying on the frame for their earth. 

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 6, 2020 - 7:40 pm
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Electrics part 3

I decided to do away with the wiring sockets to the ignition and lighting switches because the simplified wiring meant it was easier to use insulated spade connectors directly onto the terminals. The unused terminals were also insulated with terminal sleeves and the whole lot then wrapped in a piece of rubber held in place with a tie wrap.

SDC13877.JPG

Lighting Switch

SDC13879.JPG

Ignition Switch

SDC13881.JPG

SDC13882.JPG

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 6, 2020 - 8:26 pm
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Electrics part 4

I tend to use 'Vehicle Wiring Products' for my wire/cable. 'Modern' wire is the 'thinwall' type, where the outer sheathing is much 'thinner' than the older type PVC wire (hence the name) and it also has different heat resistance properties . This modern, thinner, outer sheathing means the wire has a higher current rating than the older PVC type for the same cross section of conducting wire. For example: the original wire in the harness was 1.0mm squared made up of 14 strands of 0.30mm wire and is rated at 8.75amps. The 'thinwall' wire is also 1.0 mm squared made up of 32 strands of 0.20mm wire and is rated at 16.5 amps. 

You can also get thinwall  three core 16.5 amp cable, which is ideal for the rear light and thinwall  11 amp two core cable for the brake light switch. 

SDC13924.JPG

In the main part I stuck with the old fashioned  lucar brass bullet terminals, soldered onto the wires, and matching rubber sleeved connectors. I did use some crimped on spade connectors (not those horrible blue insulated ones) attached with the proper crimping tool and insulated with thetranslucent sheaths.

The finished harness was bound with 'Tesa' polyester fabric loom tape with the addition of woven sheathing and heat-shrink in places that may be abraded. 

SDC13923.JPG

SDC13922.JPG

SDC13921.JPG

Cheers

Alan

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1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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stubaker58
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September 7, 2020 - 3:48 pm
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Great stuff Alan.  Such an elegant way of doing away with the rubber sockets on the switches, they are a real liability! 

Î

D7/14 hybrid (4 speed with D7 crank etc.) on the road, D10 Bushman awaiting rebuilding.

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Sponge
Lancashire (A chip shop somewhere near Preston)
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September 8, 2020 - 9:11 am
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Those rubber sockets - tell me about it. They never seem to go onto the switch properly and when they do they come off in use and create an embarrassing and possibly dangerous electrical breakdown.   

In frustration I  have been replacing all of my switches with Lucas S41 switches as I do re-wires and conversions ...but Alan's Wipac switch solution is an inspiration - so simple yet so obvious, wood and trees etc etc.  Well done mate - you are a leading light that is showing us all the way.  Makes me want to rip my B175 apart and start again. 

Sponge 

 

   

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Alan.Moore
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September 8, 2020 - 7:17 pm
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Thanks for the comments chaps...much appreciated.

Regarding wiring those switches. The 'blades' on the original switches are about 4mm wide. The nearest matching non insulated crimp on terminals you can get are 4.8mm but they fit OK. They come in different versions, some will only take up to 1mm of wire (OK if you are just connecting one wire to that terminal) others will take up to 2.5mm of wire so will happily take two 1mm cross section wires. 

I dropped a ****ock  and got some cheap and nasty ones from Ebay that only took one 1mm cable and I ended up using some 6.3mm terminals in order to get two wires in. On the lighting switch it was a bit of a squeeze to get all the terminals on. 

My advice is to get some decent ones from a proper wiring place. I think I'm going to re-do them with some of these (T900) which take up to 2.5mm. They are brass and look 100% better than the rubbish i bought

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Don't forget to get some of the insulating covers as well.

I also splashed out on a pair of crimping pliers which make a nice job of folding the tangs over onto the cable...

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Onwards and upwards thumbs-up

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Alan.Moore
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September 21, 2020 - 6:58 pm
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Petrol Tank

Although the petrol tank had a few battle scars and touchups my intention of trying to keep as much of the original finish as possible meant I only intended to spray the bottom (where the paint had completely come off) and the inside of the 'tunnel' which again had very little paint and a bit of surface rust. I cleaned everything up, masked it up using low tack masking tape, and after primer applied a couple of coats of black cellulose. Was very happy with the finish and let it dry for a couple of hours.

SDC13983.JPG

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Carefully removed the masking tape...no issues until I got to a length I'd only lightly stuck on as a bit of 'insurance'. 'Oh dear' (or words to that effect) as the tape pulled away a big chuck of the original black !!

SDC13988.JPG

So nothing for it now but to strip the old paint off and respray the tank. I could just do the one side but sods law means I'll have issues with the rest further down the line if I don't do it all. I used some fine line tape to setout the shape of the panel before removing the old paint. Luckily the old paint comes off with OK with cellulose thinners and some fine wire wool. 

SDC13991.JPG

There was a yellowy/gold coloured primer under the black (probably some type of etch primer?) but no sign of the chrome having been 'keyed' prior to spraying.

SDC13993.JPG

It's beer O'clock now so the rest will have to wait until tomorrow.

Cheers

Alan

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1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

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Number6
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September 21, 2020 - 7:49 pm
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Paint over chrome! freaked-out_gif

Mike H --

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