A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_PrintTopic sp_TopicIcon
Alan's B175 restoration
Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
141
October 6, 2020 - 1:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Bob:

In theory 'yes' you are correct but it is good practice to fully bond the nipple to the wire.

Forum:

These are a few of my 'tips' for soldering the nipples on.

I use a large electric soldering iron to heat the nipple. An 'old style' copper headed one that you heat up on the stove also works well. The soldering iron should be well tinned with new solder as this aids the heat transfer into the nipple. If you try and heat the nipple with a dirty iron you will find the heat transfer is significantly reduced. You can't really overheat the cable using a soldering iron but using a flame can overheat the wire strands and alter their temper.

It is important not to let the solder creep up the cable more than a few mm as this can make that section of the cable too rigid and in some applications promote breakage or stiff operation in the fitment i.e. nipples on the twistgrip end of throttle and choke cables.

Best to use a liquid flux like Bakers No.3 and dip the nipple and cable to just above the nipple. Then put cable in vice with the nipple hanging downwards. Doing it this way means flux does not run further along the cable and means the solder will only flow around the end of the cable where the flux is.

Heat the nipple until the solder melts when in contact with the nipple NOT the soldering iron and then add a drop more of the flux (I use a small 'dropper'). Then introduce solder from the back end of the nipple (the side opposite the 'bird cage') and it should flow down the nipple into the 'bird cage'. Add solder until it just starts to form the start of a 'drip' out of the 'birdcage'. Then leave to cool naturally before filing off any excess solder.

The above works well for any nipple that has a conical hole in one side i.e. cylindrical brake and clutch nipples, pear shaped nipples etc.

With the small 'ring' type nipples used on the twistgrip end of throttle and choke cables there is only one hole for the cable to be pushed into but once the end is in the nipple the strands can be spread apart with a small screwdriver. These are best soldered lying on their sides resting on a bit of alluminium (which the solder will not bond to) or the solder just runs straight through them.

Re the tiny cylindrical nipples on the carb end of cables some do have a countersunk end so the cable end can be spread a little. 

One point worth mentioning is that an old used cable can be quite badly oxidised (steel cable is usually galvanised to prevent corrosion). Whilst you can clean the outside back to shiny metal the inner strands will still be oxidised and this prevents the solder bonding to the strands. Used cable will also tend to contain a lot of oil so it needs to cleaned thoroughly with solvent before soldering. So be careful if you are shortening an old cable.

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
stubaker58
Sunny Felixstowe
Area Rep
Club Member
Forum Posts: 559
Member Since:
June 13, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
142
October 7, 2020 - 6:57 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks Alan,

I’ve tried making up cables before, without great success!  I bought a cheap solder pot so as to dip the cable end into molten solder, it seems to work ok.

One question though, what type of solder do you use?

thanks

D7/14 hybrid (4 speed with D7 crank etc.) on the road, D10 Bushman awaiting rebuilding.

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
143
October 7, 2020 - 5:16 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

For the standard steel galvanised cables I use a lead free solder 95.8% tin, 3.5% silver, 0.7% copper, with a 2% flux content, which is 1mm in diameter (Search google for Fixpoint lead free solder) . This type of solder is much 'stronger' and harder than the traditional 60/40 lead/tin solders and has a melting point of 217 degrees C (lead/tin is about 190 deg c). I also use Bakers No. 3 liquid flux.

I've never used a solder pot as my big old 60 watt electric one heats up to about 350 deg C and has enough mass in the large copper tip to get that heat into the nipple and then from the nipple into the cable without the tip cooling too much. Trying to use an iron with a small tip designed for electrical work is an issue as, although it may have a lot of watts (60-80) the small tips struggle to maintain the temperature when in contact with a big nipple like a brake cable nipple.

If using a solder pot I would think you would need to hold the nipple/cable end in the solder long enough for the nipple to heat up to 'soldering' temperature so that the solder bonds fully to the nipple and cable. Also the temp of the pot really only needs to be just above the melting point of the solder.

I've not attempted stainless steel cables so cannot comment on what type of flux and solder would be correct for them.

As a bit of extra reading this post from a member of the Ariel Owners club has some useful information ** Please log in to view **

A bit more on my cable making post...

The brake drum end of the front brake cable has a U shaped metal clevis and the nipple on all the images I've seen of 'ready made' cables shows a small 'trumpet' or 'pear' shaped nipple at this end. The countersunk recess in the end of this type of nipple is only about 4 mm in diameter so the 'bird cage' needs to be this size in order to fit into this recess and the bird caging tool needs a 'forming' hole that matches this size (the handlebar end nipples tend to have a 6mm countersunk recess).

I found that when using a nominal 2mm dia of cable (standard sort of size for brake cables) and a 4mm 'forming' hole in the tool the 'bird caging' process produces a nice 'bird cage' but the wire stands are all compressed into a tight ball with no real space for the solder to flow between the strands. I think when using these small nipples it may be better to spread the strands out into a funnel shape.SDC14076.JPG

SDC14077.JPG

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
mike p5xbx
E-Sussex
Top Gear User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 1633
Member Since:
June 15, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
144
October 7, 2020 - 5:57 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Alan.Moore said
I've not attempted stainless steel cables so cannot comment on what type of flux and solder would be correct for them.
Cheers
Alan  

I use phosphoric acid as flux for stainless cables in a solder pot of ordinary 60/40 solder
fingers crossed as I typed that, as not had one pull out so far cant-look

D? - D10- D14 Bantams 350 AJS -500 Triumph http://bsanotru.....lfire.com/

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
145
October 9, 2020 - 7:24 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Last post in the cable making 'Quadrilogy' (I promise laugh) .

I find that when I'm soldering nipples I run out of hands so I use a support for the iron to keep it in contact with the nipple (the clamps from a chemistry set I had when I was 14....never throw anything away !) . Then, when the nipples up to temperature its just a case of feeding the solder in. 

SDC14089.JPG

And here's a brake lever end nipple after soldering

SDC14092.JPG 

SDC14094-1.JPG

The last phot shows that if you add the solder  from the bottom of the nipple, with the nipple 'hanging'  down helps prevent the solder 'wicking' further down the cable.

And here is the 'trumpet' nipple end of the brake cable

SDC14096.JPG

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
146
October 10, 2020 - 7:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

It's all a matter of Timing

Thought I'd share the way I went about setting the timing.

I decided that using a 'degree disc' was the way to go as it is very difficult to determine the precise point of TDC using a rod down the plug hole as the actual up and down movement of the piston is very small either side of TDC. Also the vertical measurement BTDC is only a matter of 60 thou which you need to accurately mark on your timing 'rod'. I am sure opinions vary on the best way to go about it but here is my method.

When using a degree disc bigger is always better. The bigger the disc the wider the separation between the degree markings and the easier it is to see more precisely when the points open. I found this website ** Please log in to view ** which allows you to print off any diameter of degree disc together with a number of options as to what actually appears on the disc. I printed one the correct size to stick it onto an old 45 record (just under 7 inch in old money) . I used a sheet of photographic paper and stuck it on with contact adhesive.

SDC14042.JPG

I attached it to the 'nut' on the alternator with 'bluetac' using the countersunk centre of the mainshaft and the hole in the disc to get it centred. A piece of alluminium with a point on it was attached to the crankcase via the chainguards front mounting hole.

SDC14104.JPG

A 'piston stop' tool was made from an old sparkplug by sawing off the collar that holds the ceramic core in place and then knocking the core out. Having carefully cleaning all remnants of the ceramic away I ran an 8mm tap down the inside of the plug.

SDC14097.JPG

A junior hacksaw was used to cut a slot up the inside of the plug body to allow 'compression' from the cylinder to escape as the piston moved in the bore as I found it difficult to smoothly turn the engine over as it reached compression (I also left the crankcase drain screw out for this reason).

SDC14100.JPG

I screwed in an 8mm coachbolt (a bit of 8mm studding would do) with a washer and locknut at the top so the length of the stop could be adjusted. The end of the bolt was rounded off to prevent it marking the piston crown.

SDC14101.JPG

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
147
October 10, 2020 - 8:01 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

A matter of timing continued:

I adjusted the 'stop' so the piston was stopped about 15 mm BTDC. It was then a matter of attaching the disc and turning the engine forwards slowly until the piston met the stop and noting the degrees on the disc (inline with static marker). Then turn the engine backwards until the piston contacts the stop and note the degrees again. TDC is midway between these two points. Its then a matter of removing the tool and turning the engine so that this midway point on the disc is inline with the static marker. Finally rotate the disc itself so that its TDC mark is in line with the static marker.

Easylaugh

To set the timing I use a 'buzz box'. Basically a 3 volt buzzer from ebay, two AA batteries and leads with crocodile clips connected across the points. Points closed..buzzer sounds, points open...buzzer stops. I find this is easier than using a light bulb where you are trying to watch the bulb with one eye and the timings marks with the other eye.

Not wanting to teach granny to suck eggs but, for completeness, adjust the points gap to 12 thou and if the points cam has been removed position the points backing plate in the centre of its slots. Fit the cam on the taper but don't tighten it up..... turn it by hand until the points are just opening. Then tighten the centre screw and  check timing by rotating the engine. The points should open just as the pointer is inline with your timing mark on the degree disc The standard timing on the D14 and B175 is 16.5 degrees BTDC but based on what others have said regarding modern fuel I have set mine a little retarded at 16 degrees BTDC. Fine adjustment can be made by slackening the points base pate screws and moving the plate slightly before retightening and rechecking.

SDC14113.JPG

SDC14114.JPG

Here's how it works:

** Please log in to view **

I know that a lot of this is 'old hat' to the experienced members but it may help someone who is new to all things Bantam.

As always...if I've 'Bantamed up' on anything I've written please let me know.

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
wildun
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 213
Member Since:
April 30, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
148
October 10, 2020 - 11:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Alan,

I have been setting ignition timing on both two stroke and four stroke engines for years, some engines I use the degree disc method, some engines I use a dial gauge, it depends which dimension the engine manufacturer supplies. Typical early British four stroke timing figures are quoted in degrees BTDC, i.e. 36 degrees BTDC so the degree disc is the method to use, early points equipped Japanese two stroke timing figures were quoted in mm BTDC i.e. 1.8mm +/- 0.1mm so a dial gauge is essential for that required accuracy. The official BSA Bantam D14 workshop manual is a bit of a rarity as it supplies both dimensions, i.e. 16.5 degrees or 1.524mm BTDC so either method can safely be used to suit the owners preference, or workshop equipment.

( Just for interest, early points equipped Honda four stroke engines, CB175/200 etc, had the T mark (TDC) and the F mark (Firing point) marked on the generator rotor, and the Suzuki two stroke triple GT380/550 engines had surprisingly accurate timing marks on the points plate. )

Now to the point of my reply to your post, I have to say that your explanation, and video of your method is the best, most complete, and easy to understand that I have seen on here. Some new Bantam owners do not understand the need for the accurate determination of TDC marking of the degree disc pointer, or are maybe put off by the perceived difficulty. As you say, a rod down the plug hole is not really accurate enough for the job. But, once the points gap is set correctly, and timing is set accurately, as long as the engine is not disturbed and the points gap is checked and maintained then the timing will stay set. Personal marks can be scribed on the points base plate. This would allow for a little experimentation if required to find the best setting for modern fuel or other influences, the marks would then allow for an easy datum to return to factory settings.

So, on behalf of the less experienced Bantam owners, thanks for your great explanation. Regards.

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
149
October 13, 2020 - 10:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Chris, thanks for the comments...I'm glad my method made sense. 

Good advice re marking the points base plate when the timing has been set. I've marked mine at 16 degrees and 14 degrees (its easy to do this if you are using the timing disc method). There's only 1mm difference between the two marks which illustrates just how accurate you need to be. As you say having these marks means it is easy to slightly alter the timing between those two settings if needs be.

SDC14120.JPG

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
150
October 13, 2020 - 11:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Clutch Lever

I found that my clutch lever assembly had been replaced with one that had a 1 1/8" pivot centre to cable centre distance, the lever itself was also about 6 3/4"  long and had a cable adjuster screwed into the handlebar bracket. The dimension of the pivots centers means that it is not really suitable for the Bantams clutch setup. The correct Bantam one has no adjuster and has a 7/8" pivot to cable center and the lever is about 6 inches long with a ball type end. The parts list shows the clutch lever assembly to be an Amal 18/1091 and a Google search did not reveal anyone selling these. 

Searching on Google I struggled to find something with the correct dimensions and a ball end lever. The nearest assembly I could find, at a reasonable price (about £14 inc postage), was a replica Doherty 407PA. Only problem was that it had a plain flat blade end lever not one with a ball . So.....I cut the ball end off the old incorrect lever, drilled a slot in it and then filed the end of the new lever to make a tang to fit into the ball. Once fitted a few very small dabs with the MIG welder had the ball end secured. After a bit of a smoothing and polishing of the welds I think it looks OK and a bit of clear lacquer or silver paint over the welds will keep any rust at bay.

  SDC14123.JPG

Replacement lever held against the original brake lever...same lengththumbs-up

SDC14126.JPG

Ball end cut off the old lever and a 'tang' formed on the end of the new lever

SDC14127.JPG

Slot made in the end of the ball with a drill for the 'tang' to fit into and then welded together

SDC14129.JPG

Finished lever against the original brake lever

SDC14135-1.JPG

New assembly fitted

Just need to make a new cable now ........

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
mikef
Chatham Kent
Club Technical Advisor
Committee
Forum Posts: 956
Member Since:
September 30, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
151
October 15, 2020 - 9:00 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hi Alan.
       A bit late with this info I know, but I think that you needed the Doherty 507P.
I had been wanting ball ended levers for my D14 for years and never managed to find any. I could only find the blade type and that's what I fitted when I restored it 8 years ago. Then I happened to see on e-bay someone selling a pair of new 7/8" pivot distance ball end levers for about £15 so I took a chance and bought them. They fitted perfectly thank goodness.
However I notice that Feked sell the Doherty 507P and they look correct. Please see link below.
If you search their site they also do a matching brake lever.
** Please log in to view **
Maybe of use to someone.
                   Mike.

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
152
October 16, 2020 - 12:28 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Mike

Cheers for that...I looked at the 507P and as you rightly say they are 7/8" pivot and ball end. However in the pics on the Feked site they looked as though they were about 6.5 inches long and I got kind of fixated on having the levers the same length as I still have the original combined throttle and brake lever assembly. When you get a minute could you measure the length from the end of the ball to the tip of the corner where the cable slot is.

If (like you) you are fitting a pair the length does not really matter so yes, in most cases the 507P is a good match for the originals.

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
mikef
Chatham Kent
Club Technical Advisor
Committee
Forum Posts: 956
Member Since:
September 30, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
153
October 16, 2020 - 9:45 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hi Alan.
         Mine are 6.5" in length from the end of the ball to the tip of the corner where the cable slot is.
Mike.

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
154
October 17, 2020 - 6:40 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks Mike..that's what i thought

Cheers

alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
155
October 17, 2020 - 7:14 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Straightening bowed carb flange.

The Amal Concentric is renowned for its tendency to 'bow' the carb flange if the mounting stud nuts are overtightened. The problem appears to be that the O ring only needs compressing slightly to get a seal and the nuts need only be tightened enough to make this seal. If the nuts are fully tightened the Carb flange ends are distorted around / past the already fully compressed O ring and the flange is bowed. This bowing can also distort the carb body making the throttle slide bind. Apparently, when Royal Enfield fitted concentric carbs theirs did not have the O ring, just a plain gasket face, so not using the O ring appears to be an option.

The old trick of truing up the flange on a sheet of plate glass or surface plate will restore the flange to a 'flat' state BUT, if the body is distorted enough the slide will still bind. Looking on T'Internet I found a few posts showing how a mandrel 'tool' can be used to pull the flange back to 'true' and at the same time remove the distortion in the carb body.

Always up for a challenge I had a 626/17 where the flange was bowed and the slide was binding in the body. The 'tool' is basically a piece of round alli bar which fits inside the carb body, with the bottom end counterbored / profiled like the underside of a throttle slide so that it clears the spray tube. A second piece of alli bar fits into the carb inlet bore and a hole is drilled centrally through this bar, and the first bar, so that a bolt can be inserted to allow the carb mounting flange to be pulled up against a flat piece of plate steel. Tightening the bolt straightens the bow in the carb flange and (apparently) removed the distortion in the carb body. The following images should help in understanding what I am getting at:

SDC14150.JPG

SDC14153.JPG

 

SDC14149.JPG

So my carb started off with quite a bit of bowing of the flange, about 12 thou as can be seen below:

SDC14141.JPG

I used a couple of spacers to lit the 'ears' of the flange up a bit as the casting has a tendency to spring back a bit after the 'clamping' bolts pressure has been released.

SDC14147.JPG

Continued:

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
156
October 17, 2020 - 7:36 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Straightening bowed carb flange 2

It took a few attempts to get to the stage where a 2 thou feeler gauge would not slide between the flange and plate but it did appear to work OK. The previously binding throttle slide now moved up and down the carb body fine.

SDC14166.JPG

Checking the flange face on a piece of wet and dry on a surface plate (marble chopping board from Wilco) it was still a little bit off being perfectly flat ( I suspect it had been 'flattened' in a previous life).

SDC14154.JPG

However, with a few gentle figures 8's it was soon spot on

SDC14155.JPG

Now, I don't have a lathe so my method of making the counterbore in the alli bar (which was a few quid off Ebay) ...is probably a bit unconventional using my Aldi pillar drill and utilizing an HSS hole saw and a cheap as chips end mill bit from Ebay  but it worked thumbs-up

SDC14088.JPG

SDC14195.JPG

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
157
November 7, 2020 - 9:29 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Cleaning out the Pilot Jet

I've rebuilt the carb (626/17) using a repair kit from Burlen so needle and needle jet (4 stroke) main jet, stay-up float and float needle, fuel filter plus a new throttle spring. My carb is the type that has a fixed pilot jet, as opposed to the one that screws into the face of the float bowl flange. The brass fixed jet is right at the end of the aperture that the airscrew fits into and you can see it if you shine a light down inside the carb.

SDC14176.JPG

Apparently these fixed jets can get blocked resulting in poor starting and poor idle. To clean them out the procedure is to glue a number 78 drill (Ebay) into an old red WD40 spray tube and then, having taken out the air screw, clean the jet out with the drill. 

SDC14211.JPG

Another issue I found was that the float bowl was distorted resulting in a significant gap at the joint.

SDC14213.JPG

The cause was that the 'ears' on the bowl had been bent slightly by overtightening of the securing screws (this compresses the gasket too much and bends the ears). I carefully straightened the ears using a small vice, NB the metal is very soft, it does not take much pressure to get them back into shape and you have to be careful. I then gave the face a slight flattening on the surface plate... but not too much or the float spindle will stand proud of the gasket face.

SDC14214.JPG

SDC14217.JPG

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
158
November 7, 2020 - 10:39 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Stay-Up float

I also fitted a Stay-up float and Viton tipped alli needle as the original white plastic one was distorted. I have read that Amal changed the 'setting' level of the float over time. Originally it was set so the top face of the float was slightly above the bowl flange when the needle valve was just closed. Later on they altered the setting to being 2.0mm below the level of the flange.

With the plastic float any changes required the brass needle valve seat to be repositioned in the body of the float chamber by heating the bowl up and using a drift. However, the Stay-up float has metal 'tangs' that you can bend to set the float height...much easier.

Here is a photo with the float in the 'old' spec position

SDC14226.JPG

And then in the 'later' spec position:

SDC14228.JPG

Below: photo showing how the Stay-Up float 'tangs' are adjusted to alter the float height (clamp in vice then rotate the float to bend the 'tang's)

SDC14227.JPG

If you have a look at the following it gives good info on the changes made to the float height by Amal over time

** Please log in to view **

Cheers

Alan

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Avatar
BASIL
Hamstreet,Ashford.
Area Rep
Club Member
Forum Posts: 932
Member Since:
October 1, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
159
November 8, 2020 - 8:33 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hi, some good advice there. Regards Basil.

Avatar
Alan.Moore
Leicestershire
Top Gear User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
April 10, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
160
November 9, 2020 - 7:09 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Startup

So I've got the engine back in and after a few startups and carb adjustments it starts OK, ticks over and responds cleanly to the throttle. Initially had a bit of a senior moment when I connected the throttle and choke cables up ar*e about face at the carb but noticed the error before trying to start her upwhistle

Timing is spot on 16 deg BTDC but it has a habit, from cold, of kicking back if I am not forceful and/or don't give it a full swing with the kickstart. Once its been running a minute or so it starts fine. I find I need to give it a good flooding and use full choke and a touch of throttle...but am still learning the best procedure. 

The air screw needs to be only 1/2 turn out to get a nice tickover (1 1/2 is normal I believe). However, the throttle slide rattles in the carb so I think it is drawing a bit of extra air in due to that. I knew the carb body and slide were worn a little when I rebuilt the carb but it would have been daft to fit a new slide in a worn body. I'll have to see how it runs before deciding on whether a replacement carb is warranted. 

The 12 volt conversion (Wassell single phase 150watt max regulator/rectifier) is working fine and the charge tops out at 14.4 volts when the engine is revved so that appears to be working correctly. Battery is a 12v, 7 amp hour, AGM.

 

Cheers

Alan

1939 Ariel VH, 1942 Ariel WNG, 1951 Triumph 6T Thunderbird, 1970 BSA Bantam B175, 1980 Honda CB250N, 1986 Yamaha SRX600

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 223

Currently Online: rusty1
9 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

cocorico: 3306

Cornish Rooster: 3122

bart: 2754

Blue Heeler: 2587

David Dale: 2388

Sprung Chicken: 2366

Piquet: 2097

Mags 1: 1876

Munchkin: 1848

jess steele: 1690

Newest Members:

user

Forum Stats:

Groups: 9

Forums: 48

Topics: 11080

Posts: 99281

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1434

Members: 3004

Moderators: 0

Admins: 3

Administrators: Bantam-Super, JMD, Stoo63