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Brums D1
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Brum
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January 29, 2017 - 5:16 pm
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Just thought after a bit of a successful day with the D1 I’d post about my rebuild. Really the best part of the day was the bike moving for the first time (for me anyway) under its own power. When I bought the bike it was a bit of a shed, so decided a complete strip down was in order rather than the oily rag approach. In actual fact this could have been a very fortuitous decision as when I got it all in bits I found that the flange around the centre stand and footrest mount was cracked all the way round and needed welding. I’ve marked on the photo with a red line if it’s of use to anyone and as I say it was all the way round the top as well.

 

Crack.jpg

Other than that I’ve only had a couple of minor glitches like the newly powder coated legs not fitting through the yolks and hubs and the new rims not wanting to play together. Thankfully all sorted. Very happy I went down the powder coat route as wasn’t sure at first. Other than that the only real changes to original was the mudguards as I really didn’t care for the originals, I think the new ones are Triumph reproductions. Also the wiring is all DIY, with a keyswitch fitted for ignition and battery (fitted inside tool box) isolation and LED lights.

Anyway as it was all coming together I plumbed in a makeshift tank today, and after a few kicks she fired and into first and off she went, great feeling very happy chap (although definitely feels like the gears are on the wrong side at the moment!) One weird moment was after a stall and a start, she popped and fired up but when I went to pull away she tried to go backwards. I’d heard about two stokes running in reverse but never experienced it before (will have to watch that when I’m out and about). Anyway here is a pick of how she loos at the moment, just the tank to paint and she’ll be ready for the summer.

Jan17-1.jpg

Cheers all

Paul

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swalsh58
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January 29, 2017 - 6:34 pm
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Looking good!

Current bikes......1958 D5, a 77 Suzuki GT250 and a B175 almost ready for the road and a 76 Honda C90 in the workshop. A 1980 Honda CB400N now on the road and my everyday ride is a 2011 Harley Davidson Sportster. All bikes (except the D5) are now for sale...

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Mags 1
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January 30, 2017 - 11:35 pm
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Black and silver does look OK, I must say.

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Brum
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January 31, 2017 - 8:42 am
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Thanks for the comments. Yes really pleased with the look. To be honest it really was a close difficult decision between the black and mist green. If I hadn’t been replacing the rims then it would have probably been green (as they were already green). But with the stainless new rims the black works with the rest of the shiny bits like the alternative mudguards. I know it’s not really in keeping with the heritage of the bike but I do like shiny, as you can see I’ve had the dremel and the scotchbrite on the engine casings as well.

Actually I have a question hope someone can confirm, am I correct thinking that the Amal 361 has no adjustments other than main jet size and needle position? It seems like it needs to come off choke immediately after starting from cold, so is that normal? Or am I running a bit on the rich side.

Cheers all

Paul

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Brum
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March 10, 2017 - 6:18 pm
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Well after receiving a number of quotes ranging from eye watering to astronomic to paint my D1 tank I’ve decided to take the plunge and do it myself. To be honest I could repaint every year with rattle cans for a decade and would still work out cheaper than some of the quotes.

Anyway I’ve been practicing my pinstriping on some metal scraps with 3M 3mm tape and quite pleased with the results. Also I’ve knocked up a jig to hold and rotate the tank as I go. Just a couple of 2x2 bits of wood, metal supports with a 10mm threaded bar and tank mounts. The idea being to rotate the tank as I go, then lock off the bar with nuts against the support as required. Maybe a “bit of a sledge hammer to crack a nut” but I know I’d have issues if I had it swinging from a piece of cord. (been there before). Hopefully the pictures will explain the idea.paint2.jpgPaint1.jpg

Only hitch so far is her Ladyship is a bit cheesed off as I’ve been converting the downstairs toilet and shower room to a spray booth (dust and temperature in the garage just wouldn’t do would it? !!). I’m sure she’ll get over it sometime. So with tank templates masking tape and transfers at the ready (and plenty of research from pages here and elsewhere)  its time to have a go, fingers crossed it comes out acceptable. Will post some pictures of the results as I go (thinking at least a few weeks).

Cheers

Paul

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Brum
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March 10, 2017 - 6:25 pm
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Thats a good start obviously posted in wrong section, should be in D1 D3 etc, not sure how or if it can be moved, Oh well

 

ADMIN EDIT:- Fixed for you!

 

Many thanks

Paul

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Brum
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March 12, 2017 - 4:52 pm
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Primed and side colour painted, will be leaving for a few days before masking the sides and painting the main body. So far so goodsmileTank-W.jpg

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Brum
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March 19, 2017 - 5:42 pm
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After a few days drying of the side colour, masked off the side panels and set to with the main colour. Must say the 3M 3mm blue masking tape that I'd seen recommended somewhere else on the forum is very good. Doing the tight corners at the rear of the tank was relatively easy.

Another few days and on to the pinstriping. Suppose that will be the part of the job that could be the easiest to mess up. Fingers crossed.Tank3.jpg

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Brum
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March 29, 2017 - 8:23 pm
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Been getting on with the pinstriping doing a line every few days, and although by no means perfect for a DIY job very happy with the results. Again using the 3mm 3M tape suffered a very small amount of bleed under the tape join but with a bit of careful cleaning it is only noticeable on very up close inspection, no bleed around the length. The transfers are vinyl cut type and very easy to fit.

Overall given the cost of a few rattle cans I'm glad I had a go. Accepting it was never going to be as perfect as a professional paint job, but at a tenth of the cost I'll live with it. Have still got the gold on the off side to do, couple of days left to harden then it will be on the bike and time for a test ride.

On another note I hope the brakes bed in a bit, I wasn't expecting much coasting up and down the drive but the front is woeful. It has all new shoes cables etc, but looking at the contacted area so far on the shoe only looks to be touching about 20 % on the drum.

Cheers all

PaulPinstriped.jpg

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Mick W
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March 29, 2017 - 9:03 pm
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Lovely job Paul looks excellent

Mick

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cocorico
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March 29, 2017 - 9:29 pm
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i-agree Are you going to finish with a coat of clear petrol-proof varnish? On the subject of brakes, I was reading of a modification , on a different forum, of a mod to drum brakes which involved a shim on the shoes to give a better contact pattern. I'll see if I can find it again.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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Brum
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March 30, 2017 - 9:49 am
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Thanks for the positive comments. The only thing the photo doesn’t show is the black hasn’t got the depth of gloss that I’d originally envisioned. That was probably down to my spray technique not getting the coats thick enough. Certainly looking at Digby’s photos who has got a really fantastic gloss on his tank, mine looks distinctly satin. Mind you it makes it a closer match to the powder coat lustre of the frame so won’t be losing any sleep over it.

As for the top lacquer coat, after doing a bit of research and a test on an odd bit of metal it’s apparent that acrylic lacquer (rattle can) over enamel just doesn’t work. The thinners in the acrylic destroys the enamel in seconds. However enamel on top of acrylic works fine (the enamel solvents aren’t so aggressive). So all that I did was top coat lacquer the tank with decal first then pinstripe on top, hence no reaction issues. Hopefully the stripes will be resilient enough, but if not will just have to touch up as and when The lacquer is meant to be petrol resistant but won’t be relying on the statement on the can, will mainly be refuelling at home from a mixing can so will make very certain that splashes onto the tank don’t happen. (I’m very much an optimist !!)

Cocorico, if you do find the brake drum info I’d be very interested, thanks

Cheers all

Paul

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cocorico
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March 30, 2017 - 4:18 pm
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Brum said
...Cocorico, if you do find the brake drum info I’d be very interested, thanks

 

I think this was it, I found it on ** Please log in to view **, but I can't get onto the site now:  "As any MZ TS rider will know - the front drum brake is barely adequate at best and almost useless at worst. I have found one upgrade on another forum which involves having the old shoes fitted with thicker brake linings, mounting the shoes on the brake plate, holding that in a lathe chuck using a mandrel and carefully skimming the surface of the new brake linings until they just fit into the brake drum. This is no doubt an excellent upgrade but unless you have access to a lathe is impossible to achieve. The main reason for the poor front brake is that for the surface of each brake lining to make contact with the inside of the drum the short brake lever, which operates the cam, is already well out from its 90° starting position where maximum leverage occurs. I have made two little brass plates about 1.2mm thick and mounted each on the end of the brake shoes where the cam makes contact thus having the effect of pushing the shoes outwards towards the inside of the brake drum. I had to reduce the adjuster on the handlebar brake lever to allow for this. I have ridden the bike for about 4 miles whilst continuously using the front brake to help bed the shoes in. The improvement in the front brake is amazing and well worth the effort of making the little brass plates. I held the plates by bending an extra 15mm allowance to the length on each plate onto the same surface where the brake linings are glued, drilling a 2.5mm hole through the plate into the brake shoe (not through the lining) and threading this m3 to take a 3mm set screw. Once the threading is done the hole in the brass place will need to be opened up to 3mm to allow the set screw to pass through it. You will need to measure accurately the size of the surface where the cam contacts the end of each brake shoe - not forgetting to add the extra 15mm to the length to allow for that to be bent onto the surface where the lining is glued. 1.5mm brass plate would probably have worked slightly better but being thicker is obviously harder to bend.
- I've been deliberately using the front brake to bed the shoes in and it's got even better! On one occasion I was braking hard and had this squealing noise which puzzled me at first until I realised it was the front tyre squealing on the tarmac. "

I can't vouch for it but it may be worth a try.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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Brum
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March 31, 2017 - 10:32 am
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Cocorico, Thanks for the info that’s quite a simple modification and would certainly aid in getting the shoes wider quicker so if nothing else would assist in the bedding in process. Looking at mine and the small area of contact (which is near to the cam end of the shoe) so far I think basically mine are not bedded in anywhere sufficiently yet.

Going on the shimming idea, I was thinking though is the issue seems to actually be at the pivot end rather than the cam end. If you were able to shim out the pivot by a few thou then you would achieve the same as shimming the cam end but additionally move the initial contact point further around the shoe towards the pivot. It may also reduce the amount of wear to get them bedded in fully. I’m not sure if that would be achievable given the round shape without enlarging the sides of the recess on the shoe but it would help matters. Something like this perhaps with the tag ends on the outside of the shoes to stop any shim rotation?

shim.png

I’ll give it a few attempts at bedding in to see if it improves and perhaps look at modifying it if it remains as bad as it currently is.

Cheers

Paul

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Mags 1
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March 31, 2017 - 12:03 pm
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cocorico said

Brum said
...Cocorico, if you do find the brake drum info I’d be very interested, thanks

 

holding that in a lathe chuck using a mandrel and carefully skimming the surface of the new brake linings

Not sure if linings still contain asbestos, but I own a lathe too and wouldn't skim brake shoes even in my dreams!

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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cocorico
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March 31, 2017 - 2:33 pm
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The post quoted included  "but unless you have access to a lathe is impossible to achieve."

I don't have a lathe, but if I did I would consider skimming brake shoes under the right conditions. Have you never chamfered the leading edge either?

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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Mags 1
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March 31, 2017 - 10:27 pm
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cocorico said
The post quoted included  "but unless you have access to a lathe is impossible to achieve."

I don't have a lathe, but if I did I would consider skimming brake shoes under the right conditions. Have you never chamfered the leading edge either?  

No, I've never chamfered a brake shoe in my life and don't intend to start now!old

Four now on the road and at least several in bits.

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Brum
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April 19, 2017 - 10:19 am
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Thought I’d do an update on my front brakes, initially up and down the drive the weak performance seemed to be the main issue, however out on the road at speed (use that term looselylaugh) a whole new problem arose. Basically any braking of moderate or above induced some very severe juddering / hammering in the front forks / suspension. In the dry wasn’t worried but caught in the wet could be a real problem.

Removed the wheel and plate and made an ally pointer and fixed on the spindle. Moving the pointer around the drum it became apparent that my drum wasn’t round, but was distinctly oval (not visible to the naked eye, but about 1/32nd inch off true estimated). Not sure whether it was like this before I bought the bike or as a result of when the wheel was re laced (a bit of research and reading suggests this isn’t uncommon).

Again did a bit of research, obviously professional skimming was the first option, but then I found an article on a Norton owners web site about the problem and decided to go down a DIY route. I’ll explain how I did it as it may be of use for someone with the same problem.

Firstly, secure the wheel horizontal in the vice by the spindle nuts. Then using some thin double sided tape affix an inch and a half of suitable grade emery (I started with about 400) to the leading edge of the brake shoe on the down side of the cam and trim to neaten edges. Refit the plate and retaining nut. Carefully spin the rim and gently apply pressure to the brake operating lever (do this carefully as too much will cause the brake to grab). As the emery comes into contact with the highest pints of the drum you’ll hear it abrading. You’ll be able to reference these high points by where the valve is as it goes round (I had two distinct high areas 180 deg apart). It takes quite some time and I changed the emery and cleaned out the debris/dust every 15 minutes or so, but eventually the emery takes off all the high points of the drum and you can hear contact all the way round and your left with a shiny and more importantly true drum (also removed the light pitting I also had). While it isn’t perfect (I still think I have one short low spot of about 20 degrees) I only wanted to remove the absolute minimum amount, but at least I can brake without any real judder, and has also improved over all efficiency.

Just one thing to add, in the article I found there was talk about “motorising” the process with a drill chuck against the tyre to spin the rim and reduce the time taken. Personally I wouldn’t recommend because even at hand spun speeds if the brake grabs and it will at some point, there is a fair bit of momentum and a (albeit slight) risk of causing damage or injury.

Hope that is of interest.

Cheers

Paul

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