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More Ibayorkies D1
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Number6
Lincolnshire
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July 12, 2020 - 9:07 pm
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I'm going to have a go at doing my own wheel building, I did a search for wheel builders, found one, was planning to do a visit sometime to find out what's what, but then the virus hit. Then I was watching a guy on YouTube who builds custom bikes (from old Royal Enfields), he said he first went to a wheel builder to get the wheels redone for his first custom, got the bill 'ow much!? (preferably in a Yorkshire accent laugh ). Blow that he said, DIY from now on. In the same episode he got the other guy, who presents the videos, and who's not a mechanic, to lace up a wheel, which he did, the restorer had to finish off tho but I thought well he at least could put it together.

Didn't like the look of my originals TBH, hence the decision to replace.

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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July 14, 2020 - 7:51 am
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It would be great to be able to build wheels, please let us know how you progress. Out of interest is yours a rigid frame with the smaller diameter spindle? 

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Number6
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July 14, 2020 - 7:21 pm
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Nope, plunger with the thicker un! laugh

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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July 27, 2020 - 4:40 pm
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I did my CBT a couple of weeks ago and insured my bike.  I decided to go for my first ride this afternoon. Turned out of my street and took it about 1/2 mile up the road. Good job I took it up a slight incline because I had to freewheel it back!

I couldn't manage any more than15mph in 2nd and then the power started surging, it ended up almost dying and it backfired a couple of times. When it stopped completely I turned around and freewheeled home. I got it going once more in the garage and started out again but didn't get very far as it was clear the problem hadn't gone away (all I did was clean the plug- so not surprising really)

The gears seem ok which is a positive but I now need to work out my next move. 

It's one thing after another with this bike. 

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Blue Heeler
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July 27, 2020 - 6:37 pm
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Normal teething problems for a 70yo rebuilt bike....but sounds like you`re nearly there Alan.

Could be bit of muck in the main jet or other fuel-related/settings issue?

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lbayorkie
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July 27, 2020 - 7:13 pm
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Yes, my first thought was fuel starvation so I will be cleaning out the carb when I get some time next week.

I tried to check the timing and used some wooden dowel to find tdc, the manual thrn says to turn the engine backwards so the piston is some 3.5mm lower. To be honest sensing 3.5mm is near impossible as is turning the engine back by such a small amount.

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Digby
Leeds West Yorkshire
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July 27, 2020 - 7:40 pm
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Number6 said
I'm going to have a go at doing my own wheel building, I did a search for wheel builders, found one, was planning to do a visit sometime to find out what's what, but then the virus hit. Then I was watching a guy on YouTube who builds custom bikes (from old Royal Enfields), he said he first went to a wheel builder to get the wheels redone for his first custom, got the bill 'ow much!? (preferably in a Yorkshire accent laugh ). Blow that he said, DIY from now on. In the same episode he got the other guy, who presents the videos, and who's not a mechanic, to lace up a wheel, which he did, the restorer had to finish off tho but I thought well he at least could put it together.

Didn't like the look of my originals TBH, hence the decision to replace.  

Wheel building is not a black art or at least not for a Bantam,take plenty of pictures before you strip the wheels,or of someone else's if yours are already stripped,use the valve hole as a datum point and take your time.

When you've done building and happy with run out etc.try not to nip the tube on re assembly,don't ask why I mentioned that😂

Just go for it there's great satisfaction in lacing them and don't chase perfection,you won't achieve it and it's not necessary on our low powered Bantams.

Best of luck! Digby

'68 D14 Sport,'65 Honda CB160 Sport,'49 D1 Rigid (under construction ).'62 Honda 50 Sports Cub.

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Number6
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July 27, 2020 - 11:48 pm
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Digby said

Wheel building is not a black art or at least not for a Bantam,take plenty of pictures before you strip the wheels,or of someone else's if yours are already stripped,use the valve hole as a datum point and take your time.

Yes. And did the before photos. http://livinginthepast-audioweb.co.uk/imagex/misc/th_thumbsup.gif

When you've done building and happy with run out etc.try not to nip the tube on re assembly,don't ask why I mentioned that😂

Yes! I'm hoping to try the cable-tie method.

Just go for it there's great satisfaction in lacing them and don't chase perfection,you won't achieve it and it's not necessary on our low powered Bantams.

Yes!!

 

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Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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JustinW
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July 28, 2020 - 6:43 am
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In my limited experience, once the bike is sorted, every sudden loss of power is a bit of crud in main jet. I carry two spanners and carb cleaner. I whip off main jet cover, unscrew jet from underneath and blast with carb cleaner. Doesn't require removing carb, so curb side repair of 5 minutes. I have got an additional paper fuel filter but I suppose it's not all that great.

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Number6
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July 28, 2020 - 11:50 am
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LOL, laughthis could be why my original main jet is chewed up to kingdom come. People attacking it with pliers – I was going to say though, about adding an inline filter? Got a couple from Vehicle Wiring Products, little plastic thing not heavy so should be OK just hanging in the petrol hose, I remember from my D3 the amount of crud that could fill up the bottom of the float chamber but I wasn't using any extra filter back then.

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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July 28, 2020 - 5:21 pm
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I will buy an aerosol cleaner and give it a go. I see that brushes are also available- do these work?

Theres a filter in the tank so there shouldnt be anything in the carb' but you bever know.

I have an Amal in line filter I might fit 

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JustinW
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July 28, 2020 - 7:21 pm
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When I get the main jet out I hold it up to the sky. Usually I'll see the bit partially blocking.

One trouble with the inline filters I've got is that the filter paper basket is very slightly open at the top. If you get a bit of cork for example (from tap), it floats over the top of the paper basket. But saying that, I still get the odd bit of heavier muck in the float bowl over time. It's not an issue though, my pitstop routine is loosen screw holding carb to barrel. Twist carb round a touch. Whip off main jet cover, undo main jet and blast it clean (even blowing works sometimes)...and off I go.

I also find when it does get blocked it is after revving very hard eg going up a steep hill. I wonder if the higher rate of fuel flow stirs up any trapped crud in the paper filter and sends it over the top.

I think the bottom line is seek out a good quality in line filter! I've yet to do this. Perhaps I enjoy the russian roulette of seeing if I'll conk out or not.

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Number6
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July 28, 2020 - 7:34 pm
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I remember the stuff in the float bowl of the D3 was like dust, when it dried out, so the tank filter is not keeping that back.

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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August 1, 2020 - 8:12 pm
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Its almost a week since my first (abortive) ride. I took the carb off and inspected it, it seemed fine but I gave it a good clear out anyway. I used fine wire to clean out all the orifices.

Normally it starts within 6 kicks, but not this time! Must have spent half an hour kicking it over. In the end I undid the crankcase drain and quite a bit of black petroil mixture came out. I then kicked it over again several times and it started but ran very, very roughly and the exhaust smelt very acrid, not at all like a 2 stroke. Opening and  closing the throttle didnt seem to make much difference, normally it revs very freely. By the way there seems to be a good spark.

I was careful putting the carb back together so Im begining to wonder if the problem isnt just the carburetor, or if it is if theres another issue.

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lbayorkie
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August 2, 2020 - 8:21 am
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Having thought more about this im going to take the carb apart and reassemble again I was thinking if there's no throttle response  maybe the needle hasn't located correctly or the needle circlip has become entangled in the spring.  

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lbayorkie
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August 2, 2020 - 10:54 am
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Theory was good. Starts a bit easier but doesnt respond to throttle. It revs a little then almost dies before picking up again. Carb is very clean and everything located correctly. I suspect fuel flow issue (too much or too little) but I'm not sure. I don't know much about electrics but cleaned points with fine emery- could that be a factor?  I've tried opening and closing the strangler but makes no difference.

When I put carb back together first time I didn't check the position of the circlip on the needle. When I took it apart this morning I noticed it was on the 2nd recess from the bottom so changed it to 2nd from top. It could have become dislodged when I assembled the carb 1st time around so I'm not taking too much notice of this. The tickler works OK but fuel trickles out rather than squirting out. 

Bit hard to know what to do next.

Just paid out 250 pounds for CBT and insurance so very keen to get riding while weather is good. 

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Number6
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August 2, 2020 - 9:40 pm
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When it stopped completely I turned around and freewheeled home. I got it going once more in the garage and started out again but didn't get very far as it was clear the problem hadn't gone away

Sorry I'm being a thicko or memory is rubbish (whicih it is!), spent 15 minutes trying to go back over previous posts, niet, nada, can you give us a hint what the original problem is/was please? laugh

Mike H --

Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.

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JustinW
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August 2, 2020 - 11:01 pm
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Take off breather and pop finger in intake to feel if throttle slide goes all the way up and down according to throttle position. Engine not running of course.

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lbayorkie
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August 3, 2020 - 8:25 am
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Initial problem outlined 13 posts back in post 64. 

Yesterday I emptied the tank from the petcock and filtered the fuel through some fabric, quite a lot of small bits of rust. I then swilled out tank and found more crud but larger in size. The petcock in-tank filter was blocked but only right at the bottom. The petcock slide was partly blocked by neoprene that had bobbled off the seals*. Having cleaned the tank and re cleaned the carburetor I installed an inline filter and replaced the petcock with a spare.

Still doesn't run any better though.

*Draganfly no longer sell corks for slide petcocks, unfortunately the neoprene ones they recommend are too thick so have to be trimmed so they are about 60pc thickness. This is a nightmare to achieve, even with the sharpest knife the neoprene compresses and you can't get a smooth surface  it seems the 'high spots' bobble off.

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BantamBaz
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August 3, 2020 - 8:49 am
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Have a look at Bantam Spares, they do replacement tap plunger with Cork insert.

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