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Ibayorkie's D1
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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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May 25, 2018 - 2:06 pm
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I have read various posts on the above subject, which seem to indicate that the rear tyre is normally a wider profile than the front- typically around 3 to 3.25.

However......The owners instruction manual for the 1951 D1 in the members area suggests that both front AND rear should be 2.75 x 19. This seems to be a contradiction, or am I wrong?

I have some mudguard clearance issues with the rear tyre and I am just speculating that maybe I should fit a 2.75 x 19. Not sure what size is on it at the moment (bike isn't here) but its a chunky tread pattern Dunlop.

Alan

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Mistgreen53
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May 25, 2018 - 5:15 pm
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Hi Alan. 2.75x19 is normal, just got a pair for my restoration. Mitas H-O1. ** Please log in to view **. Next day delivery, good service. Good price also.

Graham

   

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lbayorkie
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May 26, 2018 - 5:41 am
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Thanks Graham, for the advice and the link. Alan

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chickensoup
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May 29, 2018 - 7:01 pm
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Hi Alan,

I too am using the Mitas universal tyres Front and Back. I have found them to be pretty good and good value for money.

Nick

1950 BSA D1 Plunger   242 UYW

1966 BSA D7  LBF 62 D

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lbayorkie
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May 30, 2018 - 1:57 pm
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Thanks for the feedback.  Its currently fitted with a 3.00 x 19 so hopefully the 2.75 will give a few mm extra clearance.

 

Alan

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Mistgreen53
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June 8, 2018 - 9:35 pm
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Hi Alan. Hows the saga with the rear wheel going? Have you managed to get it sorted? And the tyre/wheel clearance?

regards Graham

   

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mike p5xbx
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June 9, 2018 - 6:08 pm
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lbayorkie said
Chain adjuster is almost up to max, so I may need to have a couple of links removed (or more?) 
 

Hmm
first check that the chain/sprockets are not completely worn out
not normal for the chain to get to the end of adjustment and still be serviceable
you risk the spring link braking and that can cause real damage to you and the bike

D? - D10- D14 Bantams 350 AJS -500 Triumph http://bsanotru.....lfire.com/

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lbayorkie
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June 10, 2018 - 10:03 am
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Hi

To answer the last two posts:

The rear wheel will be removed again today as I have to take it to have the new 2.75 tyre (that Graham recommended) fitted.

Its not been easy trying to find a tyre fitter that will fit tubed tyres, most seem to be paranoid about the old tube puncturing during the removal/fitting process. Anyway I managed to find one in Shipley that charges £12, plus £10 if a new tube (heavy duty) is required, so we will see how this goes!

The chain and rear sprocket seem brand new, hard to tell with the other sprocket but judging by all the receipts that came with the bike many of the engine components have been renewed so I dont think that will be the problem. 

Graham, how's your restoration coming along?

 

Alan

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cocorico
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June 10, 2018 - 10:11 am
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It may be worth checking that the chain is actually the right size for the sprocket! Many chain sellers quote a size which doesn't exactly fit the sprocket resulting in wear. I don't have the facts at my fingertips just now, but if your D1 does not have a half-link somewhere, it is probably a 'modern' one.

Try 'chain size site:bsabantamclub.com/forum' in your browser, or look in the Tech Archive.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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June 10, 2018 - 10:41 am
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lbayorkie said

As far as the lack of mudguard clearance goes I think next course of action will be to fit a washer or two between the spindle and frame to move the wheel across slightly.

 

You`re doing well Alan....even seasoned Bantam rebuilders have been known to scratch their heads when parts have been omitted or wrong ones fitted!

I reckon Graham is on the money re dropping the tyre size.They are quite easy to fit with the right tools and a little care.Quote you received is very fair....the tube may need replacing anyway if it`s an old one.

Don`t go moving the rear wheel across,it`ll put the sprockets out of line and could lead to chain wear on the inside of the links which could lead to failure.

One last thing,if wheel has been respoked at some time,there is a chance the rim offset could be out,but only worry about that if fitting a new tyre doesn`t give you the mudguard clearance you require.When it`s all back together,carry out a simple wheel alignment check....seeing as MOT`s are now deemed unnecessary for old bike safety 🙁

Thing is,it`s a Rigid model,so that rear wheel is not going to be moving up&down within the mudguard void,so once you get a decent tyre to mudguard clearance,you`re laughing.Hopefully the rear mudguard has been fitted correctly and isn`t warped.

I knew there must be an advantage to owning a Rigid Bantam 🙂

Blue 

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Mistgreen53
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June 10, 2018 - 3:54 pm
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lbayorkie said
Hi

To answer the last two posts:

The rear wheel will be removed again today as I have to take it to have the new 2.75 tyre (that Graham recommended) fitted.

Its not been easy trying to find a tyre fitter that will fit tubed tyres, most seem to be paranoid about the old tube puncturing during the removal/fitting process. Anyway I managed to find one in Shipley that charges £12, plus £10 if a new tube (heavy duty) is required, so we will see how this goes!

The chain and rear sprocket seem brand new, hard to tell with the other sprocket but judging by all the receipts that came with the bike many of the engine components have been renewed so I dont think that will be the problem. 

Graham, how's your restoration coming along?

 

Alan  

Have just put an update in restoration page

Graham

tyre fitters probably don't know how to use tyre levers anymore. Did my own and only took 20 mins per wheel, including removing the old one and fitting new tubes!!

   

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mike p5xbx
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June 10, 2018 - 5:23 pm
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cocorico said
Try 'chain size site:bsabantamclub.com/forum' in your browser, or look in the Tech Archive.  

the very first hit on that link, once you have corrected the syntax error is
someone who really should know better saying

“All the chains are the same for the bantam range 1/2" pitch 3/16" wide commonly known as a 420” cry

FAQ chain size
** Please log in to view **

D? - D10- D14 Bantams 350 AJS -500 Triumph http://bsanotru.....lfire.com/

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lbayorkie
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June 10, 2018 - 5:53 pm
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Thanks for all your comments. Took wheel and chain off. Chain fits well on sprocket and seems to be ok on front too. Counted 116 links so that seems ok as well. When I took the wheel off I could see there was about a quarter of an inch left on the chain side adjuster and about half on speedo side. I know they are supposed to be same but this was only way I could get wheel to fit without touching mudguard at any point. 

When I get wheel back I will have to try again to adjust mudguard but it was pretty much impossible last time. Narrower tyre might help.

Is there any tolerance at all for insterting a washer- was thinking maybe 1/8th or 1/16th even might help.

 

Alan

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June 10, 2018 - 6:51 pm
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Not saying it`s the case here,but have known situations where tyre needs to be deflated to fit.Bring back the hinged rear mudguard....or maybe not...

Assemble her with what washers you see fit,remembering to factor in that particular type of sleeved retaining nuts secure the spindle.Then after adjusting both side evenly to get your chain tension,very easy on a rigid back-end,spin rear wheel and see if chain is biased to one side or running square on the back sprocket.Better still,run it in gear on the stand,because it`s the gearbox sprocket turning the chain that will determine the true positioning of the chain on the rear sprocket.

Blue

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lbayorkie
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June 10, 2018 - 6:57 pm
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Thanks, will bear this in mind. Alan

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lbayorkie
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June 17, 2018 - 9:43 am
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Got the new tyre fitted today, £20 including a new heavy duty inner tube, Aire Valley Service Centre at Saltaire.

Put wheel back on bike but still have issues with clearance. The wheel looks fine but no matter how I position it there is a problem with clearance somewhere on the mudguard, this leads me to believe the mudguard is the problem and not offset (although I don't know how to check this). Needless to say I have tried manipulating the mudguard but theres not much adjustment possible and it doesn't really improve things. Maybe if I got more ruthless and started bending brackets and filing holes in stays etc it might work- but I don't really want to do this.

I have seen another thread in which a couple of members have mentioned a similar problem with pattern mudguards (of which I think mine is one) who gave up trying to make them fit. That's not really an option for me, I have to make it fit or find a mudguard that I know for sure will fit- for example an original in reasonable condition but I haven't seen one of these for an early D1 rigid on Ebay (ones I have seen are for plungers)

So, the saga of my badly 'restored' 1950 D1 continues. Looking increasingly like it will be laid up for another year waiting for a better fitting guard to become available or I come up with a better idea!

 

  

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June 17, 2018 - 11:27 am
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There has been a lot of recent coverage on these pattern Indian guards not being fit for purpose.Only way to know if yours fits into that category is to compare with the real McCoy or swap measurements with another Rigid owner.

To check offset,again you`ll probably need to get the measurements from another owner,unless there`s recorded details somewhere you can access.

To measure offset,run a straight-edge across the centre of your wheel rims,resting it on the brake drum edges and measure the distance between the straight edge and rim.That measurement is the rim to hub offset for the chain drive side.

Blue 

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lbayorkie
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August 5, 2018 - 1:34 pm
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Having resolved my mudguard clearance issue by unconventional means I was about to set off on a road test. Filled up with fuel, started engine which then just died on me after about a minute. Checked plug and there was a spark. Tried again and it 'caught' briefly and then died. Checked again and no spark.

Bear in mind when I bought this bike I test rode it for a short distance- only in first gear. So seemed OK.

I took points cover off and things didn't look right. I know very little about motorbikes- as many of  you will know but that little screw just doesnt look at home, plus the rotor arm (presume thats what it is) has been rubbing on points cover.

Help, as always would be appreciated.

Getting really cheesed off with this bike, its one thing after another!!!!!

Alan

 

Points.jpgInsde-cover.jpgRotor.jpg

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cocorico
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August 5, 2018 - 3:44 pm
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The 'rotor arm' is the cam. I assume the misplaced screw is the one that holds the cam onto the crankshaft. It looks to me as if the screw has come loose (or wasn't tightened) and the cam has subsequently moved outward and rubbed against the cover, also probably moved round on the shaft and put your timing out. You need to took the cam off and check you still have the VERY small woodruff key that locates the cam on the shaft. Put back in position and tighten the screw.

BTW - I moved this from your new topic to your existing one.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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lbayorkie
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August 7, 2018 - 8:33 am
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Sorry to delay replying, had some issues uploading yesterday and I wanted you to see a close up of the ignition drive. Looks like the woodruff key just needs pushing in, the cam fitting on top and the screw/bolt fitting.

I have been unable to find any pictures/diagrams of how the woodruff key/cam fit together. I presume the woodruff will simply push in in its current position then the cam fits over the top, aligned by slot in the cam and the small part of the woodruff still protruding after I've pushed it in. I then fit the screw which tightens into the thread inside the drive.

I need to take a look at the cam because at first glance the head of the screw/bolt seems to be the same diameter as the hole in the cam. I had expected there to be a ridge or narrowing in the cam to stop the screw/nut just passing straight through.

I assume then everything will be aligned the same as before it all fell apart and no need to adjust the position of the cam/points.

Would be helpful if I could find a diagram though!

 

Alan

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