A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_PrintTopic sp_TopicIcon
A D3 Restoration out of the American West!
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
March 26, 2019 - 4:00 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hey all,

Over 3 years ago I joined the Club here, because I had just found a D3 Bantam sitting in a guy's shed in New Mexico, way out in the mountains. It had been in a retail shop window as decoration for decades, throughout the 1980's and 1990's. he bought it as they closed the shop, and it sat in his open shed (and rusted) for another decade. For some reason he put new tires on the rusty/flakey wheels, and had the brakes repacked.

I picked it up, hauled it home, proceeded to mine the Bantam club for information (I restore old Harleys but this is my first British Iron), took it apart, and then life happened, I boxed it up, and two house moves and over 3 years later, I have a workshop together and am ready to get back to it!

I think we can all agree I am slow, but i ought to get some points for persistence. I am going to post some pics along the journey.

IMG_1606.jpgd3-1.jpgIMG_1607-2.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
March 26, 2019 - 4:18 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Along this journey I had a lot of insight and new learning. Some of those points are outlined below.

1. The first insight of... Ummm this seems to be wired exactly backwards (to my experience) with positive earth. yep.

2. The 'What the heck is going on inside that headlight?' moment.

3. The, 'Down three layers of paint, the license number is painted on the back' - how cool is that? moment

4. The famous 'Oh, I guess the bearings in the triple tree are not captured bearings' moment (you can see in the picture the two bearings that didn't fall out and bounce across the floor)

IMG_1665.jpgIMG_1621-2.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
March 26, 2019 - 4:30 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

And to make a long story on the tear down, much shorter, eventually I got to this point.

Which is the, "it's going to be a lot of cleaning of grease and rust it seems" point. There were only a few bolts I had to cut off, all of them were rusty, but few were frozen. The bike is amazingly complete and intuitive for the most part in it's construction. The more time I spend with it, the more I like it. My philosophy on the rebuild is to use as much original as I can, but i do want to ride it. I want it clean but I am not going for a high dollar paint job. I am rattle can black for everything, to get it back together and running and then we will see from there. I can live with the orange peel and imperfect paint (that is my middle name), but the rust and grease make me a little nuts.

 

IMG_1807-1.jpgbd35.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
March 26, 2019 - 4:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Let the stripper work!

That's my motto. With a bunch of parts stripped, rust removed, wire wheel, flap disk, sanding and general grease removal and dust creating activities, it's time to start on the path of rebuilding. I tried a couple different types of primer. Found one I like. It's a grey Rustoleum self etching primer.

IMG_1768small.jpg

IMG_1716small.jpg

IMG_1819small.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
March 26, 2019 - 5:45 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

There is something really positive and rewarding about seeing the pieces come back to life. I know many folks like the patina and that is a cool look, but i love seeing the before and after of freshly painted parts.The frame was a mess, rusty on the upper and gunky grease in the cradle. I was complaining to myself about that, until i saw some of the other restorations on the site here, and i will shut up and count myself lucky! man some of you guys are fearless!

The inner springs in the front forks are going to be a special kind of messy, that is some old, thick, and nasty grease.

IMG_1846.jpgBD3i2-1.jpgIMG_1769-1.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
wildun
Lincolnshire.
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 156
Member Since:
April 30, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
March 26, 2019 - 11:27 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

All I can say is, well done, you are doing a great job so far !

Nothing wrong with rattle can paint. Providing that you get enough paint on, you can rub it down with wet, very fine 1200 "wet and dry" paper to a matt finish to take out any imperfections, then polish it back to a shiny finish.

And, nothing wrong with positive earth either, no disadvantages over negative earth that I am aware of. It is only a case of the positive terminal on the battery being connected to earth, ( the frame ) and the negative terminal of the battery feeding all the live supplies, ignition, lights, etc. If you are not used to this then you have to put your head into gear before connecting anything. With the increased use nowadays of various types of electronic ignition/light supply, owners have to change to negative earth to match the polarity conscious components, again not difficult to do, just swap the battery connections around. Most classic British bikes and cars were produced positive earth; British car production in general changed from positive earth to negative earth around 1967, this coincided with the change over from dynamo and separate regulator box to polarity conscious Lucas ACR alternators with integral rectifier/regulator. I think that the scientists of the time claimed that body corrosion would be reduced with the use of negative earth (?).  

Welcome to the oddities of British bike electrics. It was generally over complicated but still logical. You can rebuild as original or do your own thing, I do.

Yes, those bearings in the triple tree, as you call it, ( we call them steering head stock bearings ) are indeed loose. When you come to reassemble them, fill each cup with grease, push the bearings into the grease then pass the spindle carefully through the frame watching for any bearings that drop out. If they do, start again !!

You are very lucky in appearing to have a complete bike to start with. So if you have took lots of photos it is only a case of putting it all back together in the same way that it came apart.

Again, you are doing a great job, well done.

1951 Bantam D1 125, 1954 Bantam bitsa, 1970 Bantam B175, all Bantams on the road and ridden regularly, 1995 Yamaha Diversion 900 and 2016 Honda Integra 750 scooter. Horses for courses, all very different to each other, but a bike for every occasion.

Avatar
cocorico
Central France
Moderator
Moderator
Forum Posts: 2713
Member Since:
June 23, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
March 27, 2019 - 7:51 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

As Wildun says - use grease to hold the balls, though I would suggest you only use just enough to hold them rather than smothering it, also, if you don't know the number that fell out (also known as the ping-phukkit moment), the race should hold one more than you actually use, ie one less than full capacity, in order to allow free movement.

The Bantam Club Forum - all the answers are in there.

Avatar
sunny
Norfolk
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 1172
Member Since:
January 9, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
March 27, 2019 - 8:15 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

hi    thats   a grate  job   you  are  doing  well   done      I   dont  know   about  the  Harlys   Hummer  or  bobcat      so  to  keep  you   updated   the WIPAC  generators    need   the  OIL-ITE     BUSH    and    the  crankshaft   behind   the   points CAM   must  only   have   0005 " thow   runing   gap  or   the  MAGNET    rotor    moves   the  ignition   timimg      ,,  your   D  3  is   looking   good     well done   

Avatar
BSAdave
London
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 1430
Member Since:
July 25, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
March 27, 2019 - 9:01 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Keep up the good work. keep them pictures coming,

I could agree with you, but then we would both be wrong

Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
March 31, 2019 - 3:45 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

They thanks for the really positive comments, very much appreciated. I am really enjoying bringing this back. Just to warn everyone, I am getting rid of the seat pan that was rusted through and bent, and putting an earlier style bicycle seat on it. will create a bracket for that. I am keeping the positive earth system, it seems right for the bike, but i am going to try some LEDs for some of the lights.

Here is a blast from the past, in the cleaning i found, the old number plate under layers of paint, and the pic below that, is that moment when the main frame is clean, and painted!

 

licplate.jpg

 

frame-1.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
March 31, 2019 - 8:23 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Ok, here is a before and after picture. I don't know why, but the last owner put new tires onto super rusty rims (only thing he did to the bike). They are pitted, flakey, and someone tried to paint them with... something.

You can see the 'after' picture below - I cleaned the rust, and smoothed the jagged chrome edges, but that's it. (and beadblasted the small rusty bits). It's an amazing transformation (if you don't look too close).

 

IMG_1849w-1-1.jpg

 

IMG_1926v-1.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
wildun
Lincolnshire.
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 156
Member Since:
April 30, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
March 31, 2019 - 8:27 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Looking good !

The last two letters, VJ, show that the bike was registered new in Herefordshire, UK.

LED lights, I'm not 100% sure on this but I believe that LED bulbs are polarity conscious.

Seat, just my opinion but, your bike looks 100% original, not messed about, so I feel it would be a shame to put a completely wrong seat on it. I presume that you are talking about fitting a Bantam D1 type sprung seat? It is your bike, so it is your choice to do with as you please.I am not an originality freak, one of my Bantams is a complete mongrel with parts from three different Bantam models, but your bike has survived in a very original condition.

Carry on your good work.   

1951 Bantam D1 125, 1954 Bantam bitsa, 1970 Bantam B175, all Bantams on the road and ridden regularly, 1995 Yamaha Diversion 900 and 2016 Honda Integra 750 scooter. Horses for courses, all very different to each other, but a bike for every occasion.

Avatar
swalsh58
St. Mary's Bay, Kent
Club Dating Officer
Committee
Forum Posts: 1092
Member Since:
May 14, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
March 31, 2019 - 8:31 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Send me your frame and engine number and I will look it up in the factory records. 

Current bikes......1958 D5, a 77 Suzuki GT250 and a 77 Honda CB125S. I have a 74 Kawasaki S3 400 and a B175 waiting for restoration. A 1980 Honda CB400N waiting for MOT.  Everyday ride is a 2011 Harley Davidson Sportster. 

Avatar
Piquet
West Norfolk
Admin
Forum Posts: 2234
Member Since:
September 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
March 31, 2019 - 10:37 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

That particular seat is not easy to come by. Are you sure its bent? They are prone to cracking/splitting usually due to the rubber supports being missing from the bolts underneath but can be repaired easily enough.

Have a look here ** Please log in to view **

I'm not a complete idiot ............................................ some parts are missing.

Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
April 1, 2019 - 2:52 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks everyone, and WOW Piquet that post on the seats is amazing! Yeah the seat base I have is twisted, rusted through, and it doesn't look anything like the front bracket set you had in your post. it had some oddball mounting going on. Small good news, I do have that small bracket that goes on the fender, that was painted to the rear fender when I took it apart.

A friend has that seat pan for now, doing some research and thinking, he thinks it's from something else. Yeah, I am not going to muck with the frame or mounting, but I got an earlier repro seat (D1 I think) at a swap meet for a killer deal, and I like that look. I don't think I will have it sprung, the spacing between the seat base and frame plate is short. will post a pic of what I have in mind.

Thanks again for all the comments. and on the LEDs, I got 2-3 types and tested them with 6v (speedo illumination, and small running light in headlight) and they seem to work well. Will certainly post if not. In fact let me post that pic below. Tests well, was great price. and yes, the coating on the inside reflector of my headlamp flaked off to the touch, so I just brushed it and left it raw.

 

Untitled.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
cocorico
Central France
Moderator
Moderator
Forum Posts: 2713
Member Since:
June 23, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
April 1, 2019 - 8:24 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

There is a Topic on LEDs in the FAQ section and it is easy to make-up your own if you are handy with a soldering iron. I have had some success with them, though I have not found them suitable for night riding in that although they are brilliant, so that you are very visible, they don't actually illuminate the road ahead very well.

Try this search in your browser: led site:bsabantamclub.com/forum

The Bantam Club Forum - all the answers are in there.

Avatar
BSAdave
London
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 1430
Member Since:
July 25, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
April 1, 2019 - 10:34 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I fitted a single seat to my D3 , very easy to do.20151023_123117.jpg

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments

I could agree with you, but then we would both be wrong

Avatar
NoviceD3er
Forum User
Site Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
April 29, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
April 1, 2019 - 7:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

thanks for the LED link cocorico, will check that out,

and BSADave that seat set up looks good!  I find the seat I have is offset by an inch (seat rear bracket is 1 inch closer to the tank than frame bolts). Yours shows a nice setback at the front mounting bracket. if you get a chance, can you send me a pic, close up of the spring set up at the frame, where that seat posts are?

I also like that high exhaust set up, mine goes low. db

Avatar
wildun
Lincolnshire.
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 156
Member Since:
April 30, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
April 1, 2019 - 10:34 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

This might appear to be a post hijack, but bear with me, please.

BSADave, in spite of my reply asking NoviceD3er to reconsider his idea of fitting a single seat, I must say that your bike with such a seat looks absolutely brilliant. The lines though, are helped by your "cocked upwards" rear mudguard. 

So I take it all back, if NoviceD3er achieves a similar look to his bike, then great. 

I think it's good that some owners are prepared to be a little bit different with their bikes, this sort of mod would certainly have been done to many bikes back in the day so there is no reason why it should not be done now. And, there are enough standard spec bikes about, in all model variants, to satisfy all onlookers.

Regards,

Chris.

1951 Bantam D1 125, 1954 Bantam bitsa, 1970 Bantam B175, all Bantams on the road and ridden regularly, 1995 Yamaha Diversion 900 and 2016 Honda Integra 750 scooter. Horses for courses, all very different to each other, but a bike for every occasion.

Avatar
BSAdave
London
Forum User
Club Member
Forum Posts: 1430
Member Since:
July 25, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
April 2, 2019 - 12:11 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Take a look here for the seat brackets, if you need better pictures let me know.

** Please log in to view **

I could agree with you, but then we would both be wrong

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 98

Currently Online: BASIL, Lone Wolf, Felixfr
16 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Cornish Rooster: 3303

Anderzander: 3209

bart: 3137

Sprung Chicken: 2650

David Dale: 2491

Mags 1: 2444

Munchkin: 2218

Blue Heeler: 2145

Katj: 2139

HowD1: 1945

Newest Members:

_1620

Forum Stats:

Groups: 9

Forums: 46

Topics: 11635

Posts: 100075

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 519

Members: 2859

Moderators: 2

Admins: 3

Administrators: Piquet, JMD, Rusty Floater

Moderators: cocorico, xcgb