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Paddock Stands and Rigids
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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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August 31, 2019 - 6:28 pm
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Just wondering if anyone has actually used a paddock stand on the rear wheel of a rigid. I dont have a helper so it could make removing and refitting the rear wheel much easier. Thanks.

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Mick W
North Wales
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August 31, 2019 - 7:23 pm
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I’ve had a good search and all I can find on the subject is this 

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You will see that Sprung Chicken used axle stands under the foot pegs and others with shocks appear to have used a paddock stand.

Hopefully others may give further advice if they have used them.

Mick

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chickensoup
Bolton, Greater Manchester
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August 31, 2019 - 7:37 pm
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Hi there,

Not sure you would be able to get your back wheel out of the mudguard, even with a paddock stand. The main obstacle when removing the rear wheel on a modern sports bike, when using a paddock stand, is the reg plate.

On my plunger I have sorted the centre stand, so the rear wheel is off the ground when on the stand. If you then put a block of wood ( 2" x 4" ) under the stand, then remove the speedo drive side, mudguard stay and the exhaust silencer, the wheel comes out no problem.

Failing that, my brothers method with his GPO rigid was, remove the petrol tank, undo the wheel nuts, lie the bike on its side on an old duvet. I laughed when he told me this, but it worked for him.

Nick

1950 BSA D1 Plunger   242 UYW

1966 BSA D7  LBF 62 D

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cocorico
Central France
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August 31, 2019 - 7:39 pm
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I've picked up a few over the years - none of them are suitable for a Bantam. I use axle stands under the footrests.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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August 31, 2019 - 10:18 pm
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Thanks, I just felt a paddock stand would hold it firm. Surely using blocks or axle stands the bike would pivot as theres insufficient weight in the front of the bike. Point taken about having to remove the silencer. 

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SpacedMarine
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September 1, 2019 - 12:42 am
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If you just lean the bike to one side on the stand the back wheel comes out easy enough.As chickensoup said the back mud guard is the only thing you need to clear.The bikes not that heavy although I have a bit of leverage at 6'4 I'm sure that's the actual method described in the Haynes manual unless I dreamt it.although that's on a d14.

What's 7/16 in mm again?

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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September 1, 2019 - 8:45 am
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I think it was using that method that caused my back problems and six months of physio! Supporting the weight of the bike with one hand and the wheel in other, especially when putting it back in is just too hard on my back. I was just looking for a better way of doing it.

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cocorico
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September 1, 2019 - 8:50 am
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You can always lean the bike against a convenient wall, bench, etc. Just make sure that you have some padding between the bike and it's support. As for the bike rocking on axle stands, you can tie the front down to something if you're worried (or chock the rear up).

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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carpetralph
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September 1, 2019 - 10:17 pm
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The weight balance is fairly even with a tendency for the front wheel to be in the air when on the centre stand. This changes with axle stands under the footpegs as they are slightly further back than the contact point of the centre stand and floor, and of course once the rear wheel is out it is naturally front heavy. I`ve always done mine with axle stands under the footpegs, just a bit awkward getting them in place to start with.

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cocorico
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September 2, 2019 - 7:43 am
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carpetralph said
... just a bit awkward getting them in place to start with.  

I lean the bike to place one stand under a footrest, then move round the bike and tilt it back to fit the other stand. If you feel that's too much to lift, use a jack as the second support. Or even a jack each side to lift progressively.

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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lbayorkie
Otley, West Yorkshire
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September 2, 2019 - 10:35 pm
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Thanks, sounds like axle stands are the answer. I should be able to borrow some from a neighbour with luck. All suggestions received are much appreciated. Thanks.

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carpetralph
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September 3, 2019 - 7:02 am
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Just had a thought how one could make ones own bike lift. Scissor jacks are available for about a tenner on ebay.  I might buy 2 and weld them to a steel base ( or they could be bolted to a piece of stout plywood), positioned far enough apart to line up with the footpegs. They could then be placed under the footpegs and by winding each side in turn a bit at a time the bike could be lifted to the desired height.

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cocorico
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September 3, 2019 - 7:44 am
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cocorico said

...Or even a jack each side to lift progressively.  

Why worry about a base for them? It's additional work, takes up more space when not in use and makes it more difficult to use just one. Apart from that, good idea...wink

1956 D3 running, lights to sort. 7 other bikes in the Barn. 1950 D1 engine being rebuilt (slowly).

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